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Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 2

January 28, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 2

Pages 165–329

  1. Cover Picture

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      DNA: DNA-Modification of Eukaryotic Cells (Small 2/2013) (page 165)

      Katrin Vogel, Maximilian Glettenberg, Hendrik Schroeder and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370008

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows the modification of living cells with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. The method described by C. M. Niemeyer and co-workers on page 255 takes advantage of covalent modification of carbohydrate residues of membrane proteins, which are abundant on the surface of eukaryotic cells. Cis-diols of these carbohydrates are oxidatively cleaved to generate a carbonyl group, which undergoes a chemoselective oxime ligation with aminooxybiotin to produce biotinylated proteins. These are targeted by streptavidin covalently conjugated with DNA oligonucleotides. This method outperforms alternative chemistries for DNA coupling to cell surfaces because of its high labeling efficacy, specificity, and low impact on cell viability.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
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      Photoswitches: High Performance Photoswitches Based on Flexible and Amorphous D–A Polymer Nanowires (Small 2/2013) (page 166)

      Yao Liu, Haifeng Wang, Huanli Dong, Lang Jiang, Wenping Hu and Xiaowei Zhan

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370009

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer nanowire photoswitches are integrated with flexible micro-optoelectronic panels by W. Hu, X. Zhan, and co-workers. On page 294, donor–acceptor polymer (PFTBT) nanowires are prepared on a large scale using a simple template-dipping method. The PFTBT individual nanowire photoswitches exhibit a photoresponsivity of 1700 mA W−1 and a photoswitch ratio of 2000 under a light intensity of 5.76 mW cm−2 and a driving voltage of 40 V. Even at low driving voltages of 2 V or with the nanowires bent at nearly 90 degrees, these devices exhibit highly reproducible on/off cycles with photoswitch ratios of over 200. Image designed by Y. Liu and X. Zhan, created using My SCImage.

  3. Back Cover

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    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
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    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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      Molecular Electronics: Bonding and Electronic Transport Properties of Fullerene and Fullerene Derivatives in Break-Junction Geometries (Small 2/2013) (page 332)

      Emanuel Lörtscher, Victor Geskin, Bernd Gotsmann, Jeppe Fock, Jakob Kryger Sørensen, Thomas Bjørnholm, Jérôme Cornil, Herre S. J. van der Zant and Heike Riel

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370010

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      Fullerenes are considered anchoring groups for molecular electronics due to a large contact area and their affinity for noble metals. The conductances of fullereneterminated molecules, however, are found to be even lower than for thiol linkages. The effects of weak molecule–metal couplings and symmetry breaking are investigated by E. Lörtscher and co-workers on page 209. Using transport measurements of C60 and functionalized C60 in break-junction geometries, highy efficient contacts are demonstrated.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Small 2/2013)

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370011

  5. Contents

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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      Contents: (Small 2/2013) (pages 167–173)

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370012

  6. Corrigendum

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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
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    11. Communications
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      Corrigendum: Influence of the Molecular Structure and Morphology of Self-Assembled 1,3,5-Benzenetrisamide Nanofibers on their Mechanical Properties (page 174)

      Daniel Kluge, Julia C. Singer, Jens W. Neubauer, Frank Abraham, Hans-Werner Schmidt and Andreas Fery

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201390000

      This article corrects:
  7. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
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    9. Concepts
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    11. Communications
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      Building on Success (pages 176–177)

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201390001

  8. Concepts

    1. Top of page
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    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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    13. Full Papers
    1. Artificial Spores: Cytocompatible Encapsulation of Individual Living Cells within Thin, Tough Artificial Shells (pages 178–186)

      Sung Ho Yang, Daewha Hong, Juno Lee, Eun Hyea Ko and Insung S. Choi

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202174

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      Various cytocompatible methods are developed for individually encapsulating living cells with organic or inorganic materials. The ‘cell-in-shell’ structures—artificial spores—provide a possibility of modulating and controlling cellular metabolism at the single-cell level.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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    13. Full Papers
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      Colorimetric Sensors: Temperature-Activated Reverse Sensing Behavior of Pd Nanowire Hydrogen Sensors (Small 2/2013) (page 187)

      Dachi Yang, Luis Valentín, Jennifer Carpena, Wilfredo Otaño, Oscar Resto and Luis F. Fonseca

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370013

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      The image shows an artistic version of a Pd nanowire surrounded by hydrogen molecules. The nanowire is electrically connected to the Pt electrodes of a sensor device by L. F. Fonseca and co-workers to study the effects of reduced temperature on its electrical response during hydrogen gas exposure. The TEM image shows the ordered crystal structure of the material. As described on page 188, when temperature is reduced, a crossover from a bulk- to a percolationcontrolled response is observed. This effect was confirmed in nanowires arrays on interdigitated electrodes and single nanowires integrated to MEMS devices.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
    1. Temperature-Activated Reverse Sensing Behavior of Pd Nanowire Hydrogen Sensors (pages 188–192)

      Dachi Yang, Luis Valentín, Jennifer Carpena, Wilfredo Otaño, Oscar Resto and Luis F. Fonseca

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201639

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      Hydrogen sensors built with individual palladium nanowires (Pd NWs) have been achieved by integrating Pd NWs across microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electrodes, followed by assembling and bonding them to a chip carrier platform. The sensing measurements reveal that the sensors with individual Pd NWs show reverse sensing behaviors between the temperature zones of (370–263 K) and (263–120 K).

    2. Pitch-Tunable Size Reduction Patterning with a Temperature-Memory Polymer (pages 193–198)

      Won-Gyu Bae, Jae Hoon Choi and Kahp Y. Suh

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201554

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      A scalable and pitch-tunable size reduction patterning method is introduced by exploiting the temperature memory effect of shape memory polymer and replica molding of UV-curable materials.

    3. Decorating PtCo Bimetallic Alloy Nanoparticles on Graphene as Sensors for Glucose Detection by Catalyzing Luminol Chemiluminescence (pages 199–204)

      Ping Yang, Sheng-Yu Jin, Qi-Zhi Xu and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201008

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      A new type of PtCox@graphene nanocomposite is prepared by a simple chemical solution method, which can dramatically enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) intensity of luminol–H2O2 system, making it possible for the detection of glucose through measuring the H2O2 produced from its catalytic oxidation.

    4. Protective Roles of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in Ultrasonication-Induced DNA Base Damage (pages 205–208)

      Elijah J. Petersen, Xiaomin Tu, Miral Dizdaroglu, Ming Zheng and Bryant C. Nelson

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201217

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      The overall level of ultrasonication-induced DNA damage is reduced in the presence of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), particularly for DNA lesions formed by one-electron reduction of intermediate radicals. The protective role of SWCNTs observed in this work suggests a contrary view to the general idea that carbon nanotubes have damaging effects on biomolecules.

    5. Bonding and Electronic Transport Properties of Fullerene and Fullerene Derivatives in Break-Junction Geometries (pages 209–214)

      Emanuel Lörtscher, Victor Geskin, Bernd Gotsmann, Jeppe Fock, Jakob Kryger Sørensen, Thomas Bjørnholm, Jérôme Cornil, Herre S. J. van der Zant and Heike Riel

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201688

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fullerenes are considered anchoring groups for molecular electronics due to a large contact area and their affinity for noble metals. The conductances of fullerene-terminated molecules, however, are found to be even lower than for thiol termination. The effects of weak molecule–metal coupling and symmetry breaking are studied by transport measurements of C60 and functionalized C60. The results demonstrate highy efficient contacts between Au and C60, despite of deposition from solution.

    6. Bacteriophage Bionanowire as a Carrier for Both Cancer-Targeting Peptides and Photosensitizers and its use in Selective Cancer Cell Killing by Photodynamic Therapy (pages 215–221)

      Naveen Gandra, Gopal Abbineni, Xuewei Qu, Yanyan Huai, Li Wang and Chuanbin Mao

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202090

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      A photosensitizer, pyropheophorbid-a (PPa), is conjugated to SKBR-3 breast cancer cell-specific biological nanowire phage, to form a novel PPa-phage complex, which is further successfully used in selectively killing SKBR-3 breast cancer cells by the mechanism of photodynamic therapy (PDT).

    7. Dual Imaging and Photoactivated Nanoprobe for Controlled Cell Tracking (pages 222–227)

      Sarit S. Agasti, Rainer H. Kohler, Monty Liong, Vanessa M. Peterson, Hakho Lee and Ralph Weissleder

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201007

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      A photoactivated nanoprobe for cell labeling and tracking is demonstrated. The nanoprobe enables all targeted cells to be imaged (at 680 nm) as well as specific cells to be photoactivated using 405 nm light. Photoactivated cells can then be tracked (at 525 nm) spatiotemporally in a separate channel over prolonged periods.

    8. Switchable Nanodumbbell Probes for Analyte Detection (pages 228–232)

      Phyllis F. Xu, Albert M. Hung, Hyunwoo Noh and Jennifer N. Cha

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201721

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      Nanodumbbell gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers connected by DNA show significant change in interparticle distance in the presence of a specific analyte, ATP. The nanodumbbell begins in an extended state, but after the addition of the analyte, the DNA connecting the AuNPs forms a stable hairpin, which causes a large decrease in the interparticle distance.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Colorimetric Sensors: Distance-Mediated Plasmonic Dimers for Reusable Colorimetric Switches: A Measurable Peak Shift of More than 60 nm (Small 2/2013) (page 233)

      Longhua Guo, Abdul Rahim Ferhan, Hailan Chen, Changming Li, Guonan Chen, Seungpyo Hong and Dong-Hwan Kim

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The picture shows an approach to real-time monitoring of single molecular binding events by the construction of a reconfigurable colorimetric DNA switch, described on page 234. A significant spectral shift of over 60 nm is achievable from on–off switching. The switching is based on changing the interparticle distance between gold nanoparticles in dimers, actuated by targeted DNA binding. The extraordinary spectral shift allows the unaided eye to observe single-target biomolecular binding events in real time under a darkfield microscope.

  12. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Editorial
    9. Concepts
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Full Papers
    1. Distance-Mediated Plasmonic Dimers for Reusable Colorimetric Switches: A Measurable Peak Shift of More than 60 nm (pages 234–240)

      Longhua Guo, Abdul Rahim Ferhan, Hailan Chen, Changming Li, Guonan Chen, Seungpyo Hong and Dong-Hwan Kim

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201061

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      Real-time monitoring of a single-molecule binding event is demonstrated by a reconfigurable colorimetric DNA switch. A significant spectral shift of more than 60 nm is achievable from the target DNA binding. The extraordinary spectral shift allows the unaided eye to observe a single-target biomolecular binding event in real time using dark-field microscopy.

    2. Achieving Ultrahigh Concentrations of Fluorescent Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Small-Molecule Viscosity Modifiers (pages 241–247)

      Jarrett D. Leeds, John T. Fourkas and YuHuang Wang

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201472

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      The addition of viscosity-enhancing molecules to water increases the maximum concentration of surfactant-dispersed, single-walled carbon nanotubes by more than a factor of 100. Inkjet printing of these solutions on paper gives near-infrared fluorescent spectra which are characteristic of individual carbon nanotubes.

    3. Fabrication of Graphene Sheets Intercalated with Manganese Oxide/Carbon Nanofibers: Toward High-Capacity Energy Storage (pages 248–254)

      Oh Seok Kwon, Taejoon Kim, Jun Seop Lee, Seon Joo Park, Hyun-Woo Park, Minjeong Kang, Ji Eun Lee, Jyongsik Jang and Hyeonseok Yoon

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201754

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      The fabrication of nanostructured ternary hybrid electrodes, in which MnOx nanocrystal-impregnated CNFs (MCNFs) are intercalated between graphene sheets, is reported, toward the development of high-performance electrochemical capacitors.

    4. DNA-Modification of Eukaryotic Cells (pages 255–262)

      Katrin Vogel, Maximilian Glettenberg, Hendrik Schroeder and Christof M. Niemeyer

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201852

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      A novel bioorthogonal method for the modification of cells with single-stranded DNA oligomers is compared to alternative chemistries. The method based on oxime ligation offers high labeling efficacy, specificity, and mildness to avoid cell damage. DNA-modified cells can be selectively immobilized on solid supports or assembled into small cell clusters with the aid of DNA hybridization.

    5. A Transparent Nanowire-Based Cell Impalement Device Suitable for Detailed Cell–Nanowire Interaction Studies (pages 263–272)

      Florian Mumm, Kai M. Beckwith, Sara Bonde, Karen L. Martinez and Pawel Sikorski

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201314

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      The detailed interface and cargo delivery to HeLa and HEK293 cells cultured on a nanowire-based device is explored using a combination of confocal fluorescence and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. A novel nanowire transfer process of CuO nanowires allows the fabrication of a transparent, biocompatible device, and tight interactions between the nanowires and cellular membranes are observed.

    6. Graphene: A Reusable Substrate for Unprecedented Adsorption of Pesticides (pages 273–283)

      Shihabudheen M. Maliyekkal, T. S. Sreeprasad, Deepti Krishnan, Summayya Kouser, Abhishek Kumar Mishra, Umesh V. Waghmare and T. Pradeep

      Version of Record online: 24 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201125

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      The weight of pesticides adsorbed onto graphene is greater than the weight of the graphene itself. This adsorption is independent of pH and counter ions. A first-principles pseudopotential-based density functional analysis indicates that the adsorption is mediated through water. With suitable modifications, the adsorbent is reusable and can be applied in the field.

    7. Dual-Responsive Breakdown of Nanostructures with High Doxorubicin Payload for Apoptotic Anticancer Therapy (pages 284–293)

      Sujin Yoon, Woo Jin Kim and Hyuk Sang Yoo

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201200997

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      Doxorubicin (DOX) and oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) are co-encapsulated in self-assembled nanoaggregates (NAs) for dual-responsive complete breakdown of the nanostructure. The release of DOX and ODN from ODN@DOX NAs is facilitated by glutathione reduction and the low pH in lysosomes and endosomes. ODN@DOX NAs show anticancer effects and the incorporated ODN and DOX synergistically induce apoptosis.

    8. High Performance Photoswitches Based on Flexible and Amorphous D–A Polymer Nanowires (pages 294–299)

      Yao Liu, Haifeng Wang, Huanli Dong, Lang Jiang, Wenping Hu and Xiaowei Zhan

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201332

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      D–A polymer (PFTBT) nanowires are successfully prepared in high quality and large scale by using a simple and practical template dipping method. The PFTBT individual nanowire exhibits a photoresponsivity as high as 1700 mA W−1 under a light intensity of 5.76 mW cm−2. Photoswitches based on a single nanowire show highly sensitive and reproducible on/off cycles with photoswitch ratios as high as 2000.

    9. Surface Functionality of Nanoparticles Determines Cellular Uptake Mechanisms in Mammalian Cells (pages 300–305)

      Krishnendu Saha, Sung Tae Kim, Bo Yan, Oscar R. Miranda, Felix S. Alfonso, Denis Shlosman and Vincent M. Rotello

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201129

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      Surface functionalization of cationic gold nanoparticles is an important determinant of the mechanism of cellular uptake. It is shown that changes in functionality alter endocytotic pathways, providing a potential strategy for enhancing selectivity in delivery applications.

    10. Spin-Polarized Semiconductors: Tuning the Electronic Structure of Graphene by Introducing a Regular Pattern of sp3 Carbons on the Graphene Plane (pages 306–311)

      Long Jing, Ping Huang, Huarui Zhu and Xueyun Gao

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201100

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      A superlattice structure of nitrophenyl diazonium functionalized graphene is deduced from experimental results. The van der Waals interactions between nitrophenyl groups strengthen its stability even though it is a non-Kekule structure. Unpaired quasi-localized p electrons lead to ferrimagnetic coupling and open a wider bandgap. The large spin-up density forms a triangular lattice and the small spin-down density forms a kagome lattice.

    11. Hierarchical Rutile TiO2 Flower Cluster-Based High Efficiency Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells via Direct Hydrothermal Growth on Conducting Substrates (pages 312–321)

      Meidan Ye, Hsiang-Yu Liu, Changjian Lin and Zhiqun Lin

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201590

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      Hierarchical rutile TiO2 flower-like clusters grown on the FTO glass are created via a facile, one-step hydrothermal method. A high power conversion efficiency of 4.07% is achieved by capitalizing on these rutile TiO2 flower clusters as the photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    12. Mesoporous Block-Copolymer Nanospheres Prepared by Selective Swelling (pages 322–329)

      Shilin Mei and Zhaoxia Jin

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201504

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      Selective swelling is a facile pore-making strategy for block-copolymer (BCP) materials. The composition of BCPs is critical in determining the behavior and nanostructures of swollen mesoporous BCP nanospheres. Different mesoporous nanospheres can be obtained by changing the swelling conditions and swelling agents, for example, ethanol, 1-pyrenebutyric acid/ethanol, and HCl/ethanol.

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