Small

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 23

December 9, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 23

Pages 3905–4084

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nanowires: Fibroblasts Cultured on Nanowires Exhibit Low Motility, Impaired Cell Division, and DNA Damage (Small 23/2013) (page 3905)

      Henrik Persson, Carsten Købler, Kristian Mølhave, Lars Samuelson, Jonas O. Tegenfeldt, Stina Oredsson and Christelle N. Prinz

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mouse fibroblasts cultured on 7-μm-long vertical nanowires are reported on page 4006 by C. N. Prinz and co-workers. Culturing cells on this kind of substrate interferes greatly with cell function, causing the cells to develop into widely different morphologies. The cells' division is impaired, in many cases leading to large multinuclear cells. Cell motility is also impeded, something the large cluster surrounded by unoccupied substrate bears witness to for this otherwise motile cell line.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cellular Uptake: Uptake Kinetics and Nanotoxicity of Silica Nanoparticles Are Cell Type Dependent (Small 23/2013) (page 3906)

      Julia Blechinger, Alexander T. Bauer, Adriano A. Torrano, Christian Gorzelanny, Christoph Bräuchle and Stefan W. Schneider

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370142

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three-dimensional atomic force microscopy is combined with fluorescence microscopy to investigate the cellular uptake of silica nanoparticles into human cells. As reported on page 3970 by C. Bräuchle, S. W. Schneider, and co-workers, nanoparticles (red dots in the image) are visible on the plasma membrane outside of the cells. Interestingly, after longer exposure times, the surface of the cells may also be characterized by homogeneous distribution of small humps, indicating intracellular localization of nanoparticles. Results obtained using this technique confirm that the cellular response to silica nanoparticles is cell type dependent.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Nanosphere Lithography: Parallel Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanocone Sensing Arrays (Small 23/2013) (page 4088)

      Andreas Horrer, Christian Schäfer, Katharina Broch, Dominik A. Gollmer, Jan Rogalski, Julia Fulmes, Dai Zhang, Alfred J. Meixner, Frank Schreiber, Dieter P. Kern and Monika Fleischer

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ordered arrays of nanocones and nanopyramids are fabricated in a fully parallel approach by M. Fleischer and co-workers, as reported on page 3987. Single or double layers of self-assembled nanospheres are directly modified or used as templates for the creation of etch masks. Nanocones with sharp tips form when the masks are transferred into a gold or silver layer. Under optical excitation, narrowly confi ned hotspots are created near the cone tips. These structures have interesting properties for nano-optical applications and are evaluated as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy using a thin film of pentacene molecules.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Masthead: (Small 23/2013)

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370144

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Oxygen-Assisted Charge Transfer Between ZnO Quantum Dots and Graphene (page 3914)

      W. Guo, S. Xu, Z. Wu, Prof. N. Wang, Prof. M. M. T. Loy and Prof. S. Du

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201302443

      This article corrects:

      Oxygen-Assisted Charge Transfer Between ZnO Quantum Dots and Graphene

      Vol. 9, Issue 18, 3031–3036, Version of Record online: 21 MAR 2013

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Energy Harvesters: Flexible and Semi-Transparent Thermoelectric Energy Harvesters from Low Cost Bulk Silicon (100) (Small 23/2013) (page 3915)

      Galo Andres Torres Sevilla, Salman Bin Inayat, Jhonathan Prieto Rojas, Aftab Mustansir Hussain and Muhammad Mustafa Hussain

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible and transparent high performance thermoelectric energy harvesters from low cost bulk silicon wafers are fabricated using existing silicon processes on silicon (100) and then peeled off from the original substrate leaving it for reuse. As reported on page 3916 by M. M. Hussain and co-workers, the peeled off silicon has 3.6% thickness of bulk silicon reducing the thermal loss significantly and generating nearly 30% more output power than unpeeled harvesters. The demonstrated generic batch processing is a pragmatic way of peeling off a whole silicon circuit after conventional fabrication on bulk silicon wafers for extremely-deformable, high-performance integrated electronics. Design courtesy of Olga Kasimov.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Flexible and Semi-Transparent Thermoelectric Energy Harvesters from Low Cost Bulk Silicon (100) (pages 3916–3921)

      Galo Andres Torres Sevilla, Salman Bin Inayat, Jhonathan Prieto Rojas, Aftab Mustansir Hussain and Muhammad Mustafa Hussain

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flexible and semi-transparent high performance thermoelectric energy harvesters are fabricated on low cost bulk mono-crystalline silicon (100) wafers. The released silicon is only 3.6% as thick as bulk silicon reducing the thermal loss significantly and generating nearly 30% more output power than unpeeled harvesters. This generic batch processing is a pragmatic way of transforming traditional silicon circuitry for extremely deformable high-performance integrated electronics.

    2. Dynamic Motion of Ru-Polyoxometalate Ions (POMs) on Functionalized Few-Layer Graphene (pages 3922–3927)

      Xiaoxing Ke, Stuart Turner, Mildred Quintana, Caroline Hadad, Alejandro Montellano-López, Mauro Carraro, Andrea Sartorel, Marcella Bonchio, Maurizio Prato, Carla Bittencourt and Gustaaf Van Tendeloo

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300378

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interaction and stability of Ru4POM on few layer graphene via functional groups is investigated by time-dependent imaging using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. The Ru4POM demonstrates dynamic motion on the graphene surface with its frequency and amplitude of rotation related to the nature of the functional group used. The stability of the Ru4POM–graphene hybrid corroborates its long-term robustness when applied to multielectronic catalytic processes.

    3. Hybrid Platinum Nanobox/Carbon Nanotube Composites for Ultrasensitive Gas Sensing (pages 3928–3933)

      Adriana Popa, Jing Li and Anna Cristina S. Samia

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201203260

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel gas sensor based on hybrid platinum nanobox/single walled carbon nanotube composites shows improved gas sensing response time and sensitivity towards chlorine detection at room temperature compared to sensors fabricated from pristine carbon nanotubes. The enhanced sensor response is attributed to the improvement of the gas adsorption and charge-transfer efficiency with the incorporation of Pt nanoboxes.

    4. The Last Step in Converting the Surface Plasmonic Energy into Heat by Nanocages and Nanocubes on Substrates (pages 3934–3938)

      Paul Szymanski, Mahmoud A. Mahmoud and Mostafa A. El-Sayed

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300233

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ultrafast coherent excitation and decay of localized surface plasmons are used to record the coherent oscillations of the medium surrounding nanoparticles resulting from phonon–phonon relaxation processes. The plasmonic nanoparticles used in this study are Ag nanocubes and Au nanocages deposited in a Langmuir–Blodgett monolayer. Using two sub-picosecond laser pulses, low-frequency oscillations resulting from the nanoparticle–substrate coupling are observed.

    5. Highly Efficient Room-Temperature Photoresponsive DNA Tethering Azobenzene Through Backbone-Inserted Glycerol via Ether Bond (pages 3939–3943)

      Bo Kou, Xin Guo, Shou-Jun Xiao and Xingguo Liang

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301134

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Artificial DNA tethering azobenzene through a backbone-inserted glycerol via an ether bond is synthesized. The stabilization effect of the hybrid duplex with a native complementary strand of DNA for R-glycerol-inserted DNA is demonstrated even when the molar ratio of azobenzene to nucleotide is 1:2. The half-lives of tens of hours for glycerol-tethered cis-azobenzene and the rapid and highly efficient trans-to-cis photoisomerization in the hybrid DNA duplex at room temperature render the manipulation of DNA nanodevices and functionalities by photoregulation in a green system possible.

    6. Programmable Imaging Amplification via Nanoparticle-Initiated DNA Polymerization (pages 3944–3949)

      Niancao Chen, Shihui Li, Mark R. Battig and Yong Wang

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300806

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA growth on nanoparticles: Nanoparticle-mediated molecular recognition and DNA polymerization are integrated for extracellular matrix (ECM) imaging via programmable signal amplification. By using DNA monomers labeled with identical or different imaging reagents, it is promising to achieve single- or multiple-modality imaging of the ECM.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Photocatalysis: Selective Deposition of Ag3PO4 on Monoclinic BiVO4(040) for Highly Efficient Photocatalysis (Small 23/2013) (page 3950)

      Changjiang Li, Peng Zhang, Rui Lv, Jianwei Lu, Tuo Wang, Shengping Wang, Haifeng Wang and Jinlong Gong

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Visible-light photocatalysis that can directly harvest energy from incoming solar energy offers a desirable way to solve energy and environment issues. On page 3951, J. L. Gong and co-workers report the preparation of an efficient homotype Ag3PO4/BiVO4 heterojunction photocatalyst via rational structure design. The Ag3PO4 nanoparticles are preferentially deposited on the highlyactive BiVO4 (040) facets via a surfactantmediated mechanism. The Ag3PO4/BiVO4 photocatalyst shows high charge separation efficiency as well as an enhanced visiblelight response and thus possesses excellent visible light photocatalytic activity. The capability of synthesizing a highly visible light active and stable heterojunction photocatalyst is useful for other solar conversion applications, such as PEC water splitting, dye-sensitized solar cells and photovoltaic devices.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Selective Deposition of Ag3PO4 on Monoclinic BiVO4(040) for Highly Efficient Photocatalysis (pages 3951–3956)

      Changjiang Li, Peng Zhang, Rui Lv, Jianwei Lu, Tuo Wang, Shengping Wang, Haifeng Wang and Jinlong Gong

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An efficient homotype Ag3PO4/BiVO4 heterojunction photocatalyst is described. Ag3PO4 nanoparticles preferentially deposit on the highly active BiVO4(040) facets by means of heterojunction construction together with morphology engineering. The Ag3PO4/BiVO4 photocatalyst shows high charge separation efficiency as well as enhanced visible-light response ability and thus possesses superior visible light photocatalytic activity.

    2. Design and Synthesis of 3D Ordered Macroporous CeO2-Supported Pt@CeO2-δ Core–Shell Nanoparticle Materials for Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Soot Oxidation (pages 3957–3963)

      Yuechang Wei, Zhen Zhao, Jian Liu, Chunming Xu, Guiyuan Jiang and Aijun Duan

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Materials with Pt@CeO2-δ core–shell nanoparticles on 3D-ordered macroporous (3DOM) CeO2 are prepared by in situ colloidal crystal templating. 3DOM Ptn@CeO2-δ/CeO2 catalysts, which have both good contact between the solid reactant and the catalyst and a high density of coordinatively unsaturated ceric sites, show high catalytic activities and stabilities for soot oxidation.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrigendum
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Design Considerations for Semiconductor Nanowire–Plasmonic Nanoparticle Coupled Systems for High Quantum Efficiency Nanowires (pages 3964–3969)

      Sudha Mokkapati, Dhruv Saxena, Hark Hoe Tan and Chennupati Jagadish

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300312

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High field intensities resulting from the geometric resonances of surface plasmon polariton modes supported at a semiconductor nanowire/plasmonic nanoparticle interface can be used to increase the quantum efficiency of the semiconductor nanowire. The design considerations for such coupled systems are reviewed.

    2. Uptake Kinetics and Nanotoxicity of Silica Nanoparticles Are Cell Type Dependent (pages 3970–3980)

      Julia Blechinger, Alexander T. Bauer, Adriano A. Torrano, Christian Gorzelanny, Christoph Bräuchle and Stefan W. Schneider

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301004

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A set of experiments comparing the cytotoxicity and uptake behavior of silica nanoparticles into cells is presented. Human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) are more efficient in nanoparticle uptake than cervix carcinoma cells (HeLa), within the first 4 h of incubation. After 10 or 24 h, the mean number of intracellular particles for HeLa cells increases dramatically, becoming larger than the one for HUVECs. HUVECs show increased sensitivity towards silica nanoparticles when compared to HeLa cells. These results show that nanotoxicity has to be assessed for each cell type individually.

    3. Visible-Light-Induced Disruption of Diselenide-Containing Layer-by-Layer Films: Toward Combination of Chemotherapy and Photodynamic Therapy (pages 3981–3986)

      Huifeng Ren, Yaoting Wu, Yang Li, Wei Cao, Zhiwei Sun, Huaping Xu and Xi Zhang

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300628

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A photosensitive polyelectrolyte multilayer film containing the diselenide functional group is fabricated by using an unconventional layer-by-layer method and can be disrupted within 5 hours under the irradiation of visible light. This film has little cytotoxicity and good biocompatibility, and can be used to achieve cargo loading and controlled release.

    4. Parallel Fabrication of Plasmonic Nanocone Sensing Arrays (pages 3987–3992)

      Andreas Horrer, Christian Schäfer, Katharina Broch, Dominik A. Gollmer, Jan Rogalski, Julia Fulmes, Dai Zhang, Alfred J. Meixner, Frank Schreiber, Dieter P. Kern and Monika Fleischer

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300449

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of sharp-tipped plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated as controllable platforms for localized near-field applications, for example, for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A fully parallel approach for the fabrication of arrays of metallic nanocones and triangular nanopyramids is presented based on nanosphere lithography and etch-mask transfer. The overall Raman enhancement for a thin film of pentacene molecules is evaluated on different structures.

    5. Harnessing the Influence of Reactive Edges and Defects of Graphene Substrates for Achieving Complete Cycle of Room-Temperature Molecular Sensing (pages 3993–3999)

      Lakshman K. Randeniya, Hongqing Shi, Amanda S. Barnard, Jinghua Fang, Philip J. Martin and Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300689

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecules bind strongly to graphene and graphene nanomesh edges. Annealing at high temperature or exposure to strong UV light is required for desorption. Alternatively, polar molecules can mediate rapid and complete desorption at room temperature. Electrostatic forces of polar molecules alter the overlap of graphene bands with substrate defect bands and molecule bands near Fermi level and cause desorption.

    6. β-D-Glucosidase Assisted Gold Dissolution as Non-Optical and Quantifiable Detection Technique for Immunoassays (pages 4000–4005)

      F. M. Koehler, R. A. Raso, R. N. Grass and W. J. Stark

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300925

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new electrical detection technology for immunoassays is developed based on the dissolution of a thin gold wire by cyanide. The reporter enzyme cleaves cyanogenic glycosides to form cyanide molecules. The gold leaching kinetics are monitored by measuring the electrical resistance of the wire, resulting in a quantitative detection of the target protein.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Fibroblasts Cultured on Nanowires Exhibit Low Motility, Impaired Cell Division, and DNA Damage (pages 4006–4016)

      Henrik Persson, Carsten Købler, Kristian Mølhave, Lars Samuelson, Jonas O. Tegenfeldt, Stina Oredsson and Christelle N. Prinz

      Version of Record online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300644

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fibroblasts are cultured on short, medium and long nanowire substrates. Fibroblasts cultured on long nanowires exhibit failed cell division, DNA damage, increased ROS content, and respiration, leading to the formation of large multinuclear cells. These results are important to the design and interpretation of experiments involving nanowire-based transfection and electrical characterization of living cells.

    8. Magnetic Targeting of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Internalized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 4017–4026)

      Natalia Landázuri, Sheng Tong, Jin Suo, Giji Joseph, Daiana Weiss, Diane J. Sutcliffe, Don P. Giddens, Gang Bao and W. Robert Taylor

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300570

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Stem cells with internalized magnetic nanoparticles can be noninvasively targeted using an external magnetic field gradient. The effective delivery of polyethylene glycol-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into human mesenchymal stem cells with magnetic force is demonstrated.

    9. Targeted Liposome-Loaded Microbubbles for Cell-Specific Ultrasound-Triggered Drug Delivery (pages 4027–4035)

      Bart Geers, Olivier De Wever, Joseph Demeester, Marc Bracke, Stefaan C. De Smedt and Ine Lentacker

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300161

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Liposome-loaded microbubbles target N-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion molecule expressed by CTCs. Binding of the liposome-loaded microbubbles mainly occurs to N-cadherin-expressing cells, and applying ultrasound results in the intracellular delivery of a model drug (loaded in the liposomes) in the N-cadherin-expressing cells only.

    10. Roll-to-Roll Cohesive, Coated, Flexible, High-Efficiency Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes Utilizing ITO-Free Polymer Anodes (pages 4036–4044)

      Seongbeom Shin, Minyang Yang, L. Jay Guo and Hongseok Youn

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This roll-to-roll cohesive coating method utilizes only the natural gravity and cohesive force of the solutions. The coating film thickness can be effectively reduced for the ultra-thin electron injection layer. Furthermore, the roll-to-roll cohesive coating enables the fabrication of a thicker polymer anode more than 250 nm at one time by modification of the surface energy and without wasting the solution.

    11. Reduced Graphene Oxide-Functionalized High Electron Mobility Transistors for Novel Recognition Pattern Label-Free DNA Sensors (pages 4045–4050)

      Xiaohui Zhang, Yue Zhang, Qingliang Liao, Yu Song and Siwei Ma

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300793

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A rapid and ultra-sensitive DNA sensor with a novel recognition pattern is constructed by a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-functionalized high electron mobility transistor (HEMT). The rGO-HEMT DNA sensor presents interesting “two step” current responses toward target DNA, which paves a new avenue to design novel electronic devices for highly sensitive and specific genetic material assays in biomedical applications.

    12. Delivery of a Therapeutic Protein for Bone Regeneration from a Substrate Coated with Graphene Oxide (pages 4051–4060)

      Wan-Geun La, Saibom Park, Hee-Hun Yoon, Gun-Jae Jeong, Tae-Jin Lee, Suk Ho Bhang, Jeong Yeon Han, Kookheon Char and Byung-Soo Kim

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300571

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The delivery of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) into mouse calvarial defect is demonstrated using graphene oxide (GO)-coated titanium implant. The GO-coated titanium shows successfully regenerated bone on the mouse calvarial, which is analyzed by micro-CT and histomorphometery.

    13. Counting Fluorescent Dye Molecules on DNA Origami by Means of Photon Statistics (pages 4061–4068)

      Anton Kurz, Jürgen J. Schmied, Kristin S. Grußmayer, Phil Holzmeister, Philip Tinnefeld and Dirk-Peter Herten

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300619

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Quantitative analysis in single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy can be achieved by detection and analysis of simultaneous photon events. The use of DNA origami structures as reliable single-molecule probes allows the characterization of counting by photon statistics with up to 36 emitters. The time resolution and criteria for application are investigated in detail.

    14. Eradication of Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria by a Novel Zn-doped CuO Nanocomposite (pages 4069–4076)

      Eyal Malka, Ilana Perelshtein, Anat Lipovsky, Yakov Shalom, Livnat Naparstek, Nina Perkas, Tal Patick, Rachel Lubart, Yeshayahu Nitzan, Ehud Banin and Aharon Gedanken

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201301081

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zn-doped CuO nanoparticles show remarkable activity toward pathogenic bacteria. Synthesized in a one step sonochemical reaction, the Zn–CuO are subsequently deposited on fabric, and caused a complete eradication of both regular and multidrug-resistant bacteria within 30 min of treatment. The mechanism of its antibacterial activity is found to be reactive oxygen species dependent.

    15. Square and Rectangular Symmetry Tiles from Bulk and Thin Film 3-Miktoarm Star Terpolymers (pages 4077–4084)

      Karim Aissou, Adam Nunns, Ian Manners and Caroline A. Ross

      Version of Record online: 4 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201300657

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      3-miktoarm star terpolymer chains consisting of polyisoprene (PI), polystyrene (PS), and polyferrocenylethylmethylsilane (PFS) self-assemble into a (4.82) Archimedean tiling pattern with PFS (approximately square) domains occupying positions between the approximately octagonal PS and PI.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION