Small

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 5

March 11, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 5

Pages 645–799

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      HIV Detection: Solid-State Nanopore Detection of Protein Complexes: Applications in Healthcare and Protein Kinetics (Small 5/2013) (page 645)

      Kevin J. Freedman, Arangassery R. Bastian, Irwin Chaiken and Min Jun Kim

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370026

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An individual nanopore drilled within an ultra-thin membrane created by M. J. Kim and co-workers provides a unique look into single-molecule structure and kinetics. The platform, described on page 750, can detect various subpopulations of protein–protein complexes and calculates their excluded volumes. Furthermore, the elevated electric field strengths within the pore can dissociate the freely translocating protein complexes, generating unique current signatures. The proposed method of locally unbinding protein molecules allows the specificity of diagnostic nanopore sensors to be enhanced, and the recently unbound state of a protein can be studied.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Alloy Nanocrystals: Kinetically Controlled Growth of Polyhedral Bimetallic Alloy Nanocrystals Exclusively Bound by High-Index Facets: Au–Pd Hexoctahedra (Small 5/2013) (page 646)

      Young Wook Lee, Dongheun Kim, Jong Wook Hong, Shin Wook Kang, Sang Bok Lee and Sang Woo Han

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370027

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Manipulating the nanocrystal (NC) growth kinetics via control of the amount of reductant is the key synthetic lever to control the morphology of Au–Pd NCs. The alloys, which have a hexoctahedral structure enclosed exclusively by high-index {541} facets, are prepared on page 660 by S. W. Han and co-workers via the simultaneous reduction of Au and Pd precursors without seeds or additional metal ions as structure-regulating agents. These NCs exhibit higher catalytic performances toward the electro-oxidation of ethanol than Au–Pd alloy NCs bound by low-index facets.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Microfluidics: Three Dimensional, Sheathless, and High-Throughput Microparticle Inertial Focusing Through Geometry-Induced Secondary Flows (Small 5/2013) (page 804)

      Aram J. Chung, Daniel R. Gossett and Dino Di Carlo

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370028

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The process of single-stream microparticle inertial focusing in a single focal plane without sheath fluids and external forces, all in a high-throughput manner, is described on page 685 by D. Di Carlo and co-workers. The proposed design consists of a low-aspect-ratio straight channel interspersed with a series of constrictions in height arranged orthogonally, making use of two inertial effects: inertial microparticle focusing and geometry-induced secondary flows. A focusing efficiency as high as 99.77% is demonstrated, with a throughput as high as 36 000 particles s−1 for a variety of different sized particles and cells. Cover illustration by Marc Lim.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Masthead: (Small 5/2013)

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370029

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Contents: (Small 5/2013) (pages 647–653)

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370030

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Thermo-Active Elastomer Composite for Optical Heating in Microfluidic Systems (pages 654–659)

      Matthias Geissler, Benoît Voisin, Liviu Clime, Boris Le Drogoff and Teodor Veres

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as doping agents to form thermo-active composites with an elastomeric block-copolymer. Thermal imaging reveals that the temperature response upon irradiation with NIR laser light is dependent (among other things) on the mass fraction of the nanotubes in the polymer matrix.

    2. Kinetically Controlled Growth of Polyhedral Bimetallic Alloy Nanocrystals Exclusively Bound by High-Index Facets: Au–Pd Hexoctahedra (pages 660–665)

      Young Wook Lee, Dongheun Kim, Jong Wook Hong, Shin Wook Kang, Sang Bok Lee and Sang Woo Han

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201813

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Au–Pd alloy nanocrystals (NCs) with a hexoctahedral structure, enclosed exclusively by high-index {541} facets, are prepared via the simultaneous reduction of Au and Pd precursors without added seeds or additional metal ions as structure-regulating agents. Manipulating the NC growth kinetics via control of the relative amount of reductant is the key synthetic lever for controlling the morphology of the Au–Pd NCs. The hexoctahedral Au–Pd NCs exhibit higher catalytic performance toward the electro-oxidation of ethanol than low-index-faceted Au–Pd NCs.

    3. Adsorption of Multimeric T Cell Antigens on Carbon Nanotubes: Effect on Protein Structure and Antigen-Specific T Cell Stimulation (pages 666–672)

      Tarek R. Fadel, Nan Li, Smith Shah, Michael Look, Lisa D. Pfefferle, Gary L. Haller, Sune Justesen, Corey J. Wilson and Tarek M. Fahmy

      Version of Record online: 23 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201684

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Antigen-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells can be enhanced up to three-fold more than soluble controls when using functionalized bundled carbon nanotube substrates (bCNTs). To overcome the denaturing effects of direct adsorption on bCNTs, a simple but robust method is demonstrated to stabilize the T cell stimulus on carbon nanotube substrates through non-covalent attachment of the linker neutravidin.

    4. IsoDGR-Tagged Albumin: A New αvβ3 Selective Carrier for Nanodrug Delivery to Tumors (pages 673–678)

      Flavio Curnis, Angelina Sacchi, Renato Longhi, Barbara Colombo, Anna Gasparri and Angelo Corti

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202310

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new cyclic peptide containing the isoDGR motif that, after coupling to albumin, selectively binds αvβ3, an integrin overexpressed in the tumor vasculature. IsoDGR-tagged albumin binds tumor vessels and can be exploited as a carrier for the preparation of tumor vasculature-selective nanomedicines, such as gold nanoparticles (Au) carrying tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), a potent vascular damaging agent.

  7. Full Paper

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Periodic Modulations of Optical Tweezers Near Solid-State Membranes (pages 679–684)

      Gautam V. Soni, Magnus P. Jonsson and Cees Dekker

      Version of Record online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201875

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optical tweezers operated near solid-state membranes show unexplained periodic modulations in the optical trap position. An experimental study of the oscillations is presented, as well as optical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain method, providing insight into the underlying interference phenomenon. This work provides a complete description as well as a solution to the enduring problem of modulations in optical traps near solid-state membranes.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Three Dimensional, Sheathless, and High-Throughput Microparticle Inertial Focusing Through Geometry-Induced Secondary Flows (pages 685–690)

      Aram J. Chung, Daniel R. Gossett and Dino Di Carlo

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202413

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel inertial focusing platform creates a single-stream microparticle train in a single-focal plane without sheath fluids and external forces, all in a high-throughput manner. The proposed design consists of a low-aspect-ratio straight channel interspersed with a series of constrictions in height arranged orthogonally, making use of inertial focusing and geometry-induced secondary flows. Focusing efficiency as high as 99.77% is demonstrated with throughput as high as 36 000 particles s−1 for a variety of different sized particles and cells.

    2. Helium Implantation Effects on the Compressive Response of Cu Nanopillars (pages 691–696)

      Qiang Guo, Peri Landau, Peter Hosemann, Yongqiang Wang and Julia R. Greer

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201614

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A fabrication methodology for 120 nm-diameter, <111>-oriented single crystalline Cu nanopillars which are uniformly implanted with helium is described. Uniaxial compression experiments reveal that their yield strength is 30% higher than that of their unimplanted counterparts. This study sheds light on the fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanism of irradiated metallic nanocrystals, and has important implications for the interplay between irradiation-induced defects and the external sample dimensions in the nanoscale.

    3. Involvement of Lysosomal Exocytosis in the Excretion of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles and Enhancement of the Drug Delivery Effect by Exocytosis Inhibition (pages 697–704)

      Rolando E. Yanes, Derrick Tarn, Angela A. Hwang, Daniel P. Ferris, Sean P. Sherman, Courtney R. Thomas, Jie Lu, April D. Pyle, Jeffrey I. Zink and Fuyuhiko Tamanoi

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The exocytosis of phosphonate modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (P-MSNs) is demonstrated and lysosomal exocytosis is identified as the mechanism responsible for this event. Regulation of P-MSN exocytosis can be achieved by inhibiting or accelerating lysosomal exocytosis. Slowing down P-MSN exocytosis enhances the drug delivery effect of CPT-loaded P-MSNs by improving cell killing.

    4. Synthesis of Fivefold Stellate Polyhedral Gold Nanoparticles with {110}-Facets via a Seed-Mediated Growth Method (pages 705–710)

      Lin Jiang, Yuxin Tang, Chihao Liow, Jinsong Wu, Yinghui Sun, Yueyue Jiang, Zhili Dong, Shuzhou Li, Vinayak P. Dravid and Xiaodong Chen

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202561

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New Type of Gold Nanoparticle: A new class of fivefold stellate polyhedral gold nanoparticles (FSPAuNPs) with {110} facets have been synthesized by a seed-mediated growth method without adding surfactant. The size of FSPAuNPs can be simply adjusted from nanoscale to microscale by varying the amount of seeds, which results in a shift of the surface plasmon resonance peak from the visible to the NIR range.

    5. Large Area Resist-Free Soft Lithographic Patterning of Graphene (pages 711–715)

      Antony George, S. Mathew, Raoul van Gastel, Maarten Nijland, K. Gopinadhan, Peter Brinks, T. Venkatesan and Johan E. ten Elshof

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201889

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Large area low-cost patterning is a challenging problem in graphene research. A resist-free, single-step, large area and cost effective soft lithographic patterning strategy is presented for graphene. The technique is applicable on any arbitrary substrate that needs to be covered with a graphene film and provides a viable route to large-area patterning of graphene for device applications.

    6. Oriented Molecular Attachments Through Sol–Gel Chemistry for Synthesis of Ultrathin Hydrated Vanadium Pentoxide Nanosheets and Their Applications (pages 716–721)

      Xianhong Rui, Ziyang Lu, Zongyou Yin, Dao Hao Sim, Ni Xiao, Tuti Mariana Lim, Huey Hoon Hng, Hua Zhang and Qingyu Yan

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201473

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrathin single-crystalline V2O5·0.76H2O nanosheets with a thickness of 1.5–2.6 nm are prepared on the basis of molecular-level ‘oriented attachment’ through special sol–gel chemistry. The initial formation of 3–7 nm nanodiscs by confining the condensation reactions within the ab plane is critical to form nanosheets. As a proof-of-concept, these nanosheets exhibit good properties for hydrogen sensors and supercapacitors.

    7. Continuous Microwire Patterns Dominated by Controllable Rupture of Liquid Films (pages 722–726)

      Zhiqing Xin, Bin Su, Jianjun Wang, Xingye Zhang, Zhiliang Zhang, Mengmeng Deng, Yanlin Song and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202515

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Controllable microwire patterns are prepared by dominating the rupture of liquid films. Regular rhombic-shaped micropillar arrays serve as wetting defects to pin or depin liquids, yielding continuous, herringbone, bead-shaped polystyrene microwire patterns or bead arrays. The results provide a deeper understanding of the controllable rupture of liquid films and offer a general strategy for the organization of polymers into structures needed for wiring, interconnects, and functional devices for future microfabrication.

    8. Memory Devices Using a Mixture of MoS2 and Graphene Oxide as the Active Layer (pages 727–731)

      Zongyou Yin, Zhiyuan Zeng, Juqing Liu, Qiyuan He, Peng Chen and Hua Zhang

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201940

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mixed film consisting of 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets is used to fabricate memory devices. The conductive MoS2 component in the MoS2-GO film increases the film conductivity, thus facilitating oxygen migration in GO. The MoS2-GO film-based device exhibits rewritable, nonvolatile, electrical bistable switching with low switching voltage (≤1.5 V) and high ON/OFF current ratio (≈102).

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Metallic Nanowire Networks: Transparent Nanowire Network Electrode for Textured Semiconductors (Small 5/2013) (page 732)

      Jinwei Gao, Ke Pei, Tianyi Sun, Yaohui Wang, Linghai Zhang, Weijin Peng, Qinggeng Lin, Michael Giersig, Krzysztof Kempa, Zhifeng Ren and Yang Wang

      Version of Record online: 4 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A silver nanowire network electrode (NNE) is designed and made inexpensively on the surface of textured silicon by J. W. Gao, Y. Wang, and co-workers on page 733. The NNE is formed by depositing and sintering silver nanoparticles on the textured silicon surface. The scanning electron microscope images show that the NNE is indeed formed in the valleys between the pyramids of the textured surface. When given an anti-reflection coating, the NNE is very efficient in suppressing reflections, in addition to being highly electrically conducting.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Paper
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Full Papers
    1. Transparent Nanowire Network Electrode for Textured Semiconductors (pages 733–737)

      Jinwei Gao, Ke Pei, Tianyi Sun, Yaohui Wang, Linghai Zhang, Weijin Peng, Qinggeng Lin, Michael Giersig, Krzysztof Kempa, Zhifeng Ren and Yang Wang

      Version of Record online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201904

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An inexpensive and easily manufacturable silver nanowire network electrode (NNE) is demonstrated. The NNE is formed from nanoparticles by sintering of the nanoparticles that occupy the valleys between pyramids of the textured silicon surface. The results show that NNE combined with an anti-reflection coating is almost as efficient in suppressing the reflection as the coating alone, but with the added benefit of high conductivity.

    2. Microglia Response and In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Methylprednisolone-Loaded Dendrimer Nanoparticles in Spinal Cord Injury (pages 738–749)

      Susana R. Cerqueira, Joaquim M. Oliveira, Nuno A. Silva, Hugo Leite-Almeida, Silvina Ribeiro-Samy, Armando Almeida, João F. Mano, Nuno Sousa, António J. Salgado and Rui L. Reis

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201888

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A surface-engineered carboxymethylchitosan/polyamidoamine (CMCht/PAMAM) dendrimer nanoparticle is presented as an intracellular delivery vehicle of methylprednisolone to glial cells, for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. The local and sustained delivery following lateral hemisection in rats reveals significant improvements in the locomotor output of nanoparticle-treated animals, suggesting that this system can be valuable in the reduction of secondary injuries following SCI.

      Corrected by:

      Corrigendum: Microglia Response and In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Methylprednisolone-Loaded Dendrimer Nanoparticles in Spinal Cord Injury

      Vol. 12, Issue 8, 972, Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2016

    3. Solid-State Nanopore Detection of Protein Complexes: Applications in Healthcare and Protein Kinetics (pages 750–759)

      Kevin J. Freedman, Arangassery R. Bastian, Irwin Chaiken and Min Jun Kim

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201423

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanopore platform is shown to detect various sub-populations of protein-protein complexes as well as dissociate freely translocating proteins generating unique current signatures. The proposed method of locally unbinding protein molecules allows enhancement of the specificity of diagnostic nanopore sensors as well as the abiltiy to study the recently unbound state of a protein. These applications underscore the label-free, inexpensive, electrical detection scheme offered by nanopore-based devices.

    4. Rapid, Controllable Fabrication of Regular Complex Microarchitectures by Capillary Assembly of Micropillars and Their Application in Selectively Trapping/Releasing Microparticles (pages 760–767)

      Dong Wu, Si-Zhu Wu, Shuai Zhao, Jia Yao, Jiang-Nan Wang, Qi-Dai Chen and Hong-Bo Sun

      Version of Record online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201689

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Strategies to realize controllable 3D microstructures and to reversibly trap and release microparticles are demonstrated. This technique controls the height, shape, width, and arrangement of the pillar arrays and realizes a series of microstructures by a combined top-down/bottom-up method. The fabricated ‘mechanical hand’-like 4-cell arrays are used to selectively trap/release microparticles with different sizes. Its underlying physical mechanism is attributed to the combined action of capillary, van der Waals, and swelling forces.

    5. Combinatorial On-Chip Study of Miniaturized 3D Porous Scaffolds Using a Patterned Superhydrophobic Platform (pages 768–778)

      Mariana B. Oliveira, Christiane L. Salgado, Wenlong Song and João F. Mano

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201436

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Combinatorial array-based study of 3D porous scaffolds using biomimetic-inspired platforms is performed by fabricating polymeric porous structures in wettable patterns of a superhydrophobic surface. Scaffolds’ elastic modulus, porosity and protein adsorption rates are measured on-chip. The analysis of the combinatorial effect of these distinct variables in the behavior of two types of cells is carried out by non-destructive image-based methods.

    6. Lattice Deformation and Domain Distortion in the Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Thin Films on Chemical Patterns (pages 779–784)

      Ji Xu, Thomas P. Russell and Antonio Checco

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201950

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembly of cylindrical microdomains confined within chemically patterned stripes is studied. For stripes with widths comparable to the period of the copolymer, L0, a transition from n to n+1 microdomain rows is observed when the stripe width is close to n±1/2 L0. In the case of 1D microdomain arrays confined within stripes ∼1.2 L0 to ∼2.0 L0-wide, the incommensurability between the copolymer period and stripe width results in an elongation of the microdomains perpendicular to the stripe. The lack of topography facilitates stress distribution across the film, thereby stabilizing lattice strains significantly larger than those observable under confinement within topographical patterns.

    7. Revealing Rotational Modes of Functionalized Gold Nanorods on Live Cell Membranes (pages 785–792)

      Yan Gu, Wei Sun, Gufeng Wang, Michael T. Zimmermann, Robert L. Jernigan and Ning Fang

      Version of Record online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201808

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) technique is combined with correlation analysis to identify the fundamental rotational modes: in-plane rotation and out-of-plane tilting, as well as other more complex rotational patterns, from the vast image data captured at a temporal resolution of 5 ms for single gold nanorod probes in live cell imaging experiments.

    8. Controlled Synthesis of Hollow Cu2-xTe Nanocrystals Based on the Kirkendall Effect and Their Enhanced CO Gas-Sensing Properties (pages 793–799)

      Guanjun Xiao, Yi Zeng, Yueyue Jiang, Jiajia Ning, Weitao Zheng, Bingbing Liu, Xiaodong Chen, Guangtian Zou and Bo Zou

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202083

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hollow Cu2-xTe nanocrystals (NCs) with tunable void volume are synthesized based on the Kirkendall effect. The as-prepared Cu2-xTe NC-based sensor exhibits greatly enhanced sensitivity for detecting CO, owing to the small grain size and large surface-to-volume ratio.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION