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Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 6

March 25, 2013

Volume 9, Issue 6

Pages 805–957

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
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      Carbon Nanotubes: High-Temperature Operating Non-volatile Memory of Printable Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Self-Assembled with a Conjugate Block Copolymer (Small 6/2013) (page 805)

      Sun Kak Hwang, Jae Ryung Choi, Insung Bae, Ihn Hwang, Suk Man Cho, June Huh and Cheolmin Park

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370032

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      C. Park and co-workers develop high-performance, printable, non-volatile polymer memories with solution-processed nanocomposite films of a conjugated block copolymer, poly(styrene-block-paraphenylene) (PS-b-PPP), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The devices, described on page 831, show excellent reliability of both data retention over time and read/write cycle endurance at high temperatures of up to 100 °C without significant performance degradation. This arises from the strong, non-destructive, and isomorphic π–π interactions between the SWNTs and the PPP block.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
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      Drug Delivery: Shuttle-Mediated Nanoparticle Delivery to the Blood–Brain Barrier (Small 6/2013) (page 806)

      Daniela Guarnieri, Annarita Falanga, Ornella Muscetti, Rossella Tarallo, Sabato Fusco, Massimiliano Galdiero, Stefania Galdiero and Paolo A. Netti

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370033

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      Viruses are formidable micromachines able to overcome potent physiological barriers and to penetrate deep inside our tissues. Following a bioinspired approach, S. Galdiero, P. A. Netti, and co-workers created a novel class of nanoparticles able to cross the vascular brain endothelium membrane, obtained by decorating their surface with the membranotropic gH625 peptide sequence derived from the glycoprotein gH of Herpes simplex type 1 virus envelope. This promising strategy, described on page 853, paves the way for designing delivery systems to improve administration of therapeutical compounds to the brain.

  3. Back Cover

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    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
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      Ultrathin Nanowires: Features of Transport in Ultrathin Gold Nanowire Structures (Small 6/2013) (page 960)

      Sergii Pud, Alexandre Kisner, Marc Heggen, Dagmawi Belaineh, Ruslan Temirov, Ulrich Simon, Andreas Offenhäusser, Yulia Mourzina and Svetlana Vitusevich

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370034

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      The contact interface between large metal electrodes and ultrathin gold nanowires produced from a chemical synthesis is investigated by S. Pud, S. Vitusevich, and co-workers. The conduction through this junction is influenced by physisorbed molecules on the nanowires. The electrical transport mechanism through the electrode–nanowires interface is explained on page 846 in the context of thermal fluctuationinduced tunneling theory, and is confirmed by microscopy measurements.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Small 6/2013)

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370035

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
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      Contents: (Small 6/2013) (pages 807–812)

      Article first published online: 15 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201370036

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. Complementary Logic Gate Arrays Based on Carbon Nanotube Network Transistors (pages 813–819)

      Pingqi Gao, Jianping Zou, Hong Li, Kang Zhang and Qing Zhang

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201237

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      An efficient technique of fabricating high performance n- and p- type single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network field-effect transistors (NET-FETs) is successfully demonstrated. Complementary inverters, NOR, NAND, OR, AND logic gates have been achieved from integrating these p- and n-type SWNT-NET-FETs. The processing technique described here is fully compatible with conventional silicon microelectronic technologies and it is readily suitable for scalable integration.

    2. Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanoribbon Networks: A Novel Approach towards Scalable Fabrication of Transparent Conductive Films (pages 820–824)

      Haiyong He, Xianglong Li, Jie Wang, Tengfei Qiu, Yan Fang, Qi Song, Bin Luo, Xianfeng Zhang and Linjie Zhi

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201918

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      An innovative approach is developed for the high-throughput, large-area, and low-cost fabrication of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanoribbon networks by using electrospun polymer-based nanowires as the etching mask. Combined with their tunable, controllable structures and transmittance/conductivity properties, the as-fabricated RGO nanoribbon networks exhibit potential as transparent conductive film electrodes, for example, in electrochromic devices.

    3. Generalized Approach to the Synthesis of Reversible Concentric and Eccentric Polymer-Coated Nanostructures (pages 825–830)

      Lu Li, Lingyu Zhang, Shuangxi Xing, Tingting Wang, Shunrui Luo, Xueqing Zhang, Cong Liu, Zhongmin Su and Chungang Wang

      Article first published online: 4 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201735

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      A very facile, general, and reproducible method is developed for the controlled synthesis of discrete and monodisperse concentric and eccentric poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated nanostructures in a large-scale, independent of their size, geometry, or composition. Interestingly, the reversible structural transformation between concentricity and eccentricity can be easily achieved, which is determined by the change in interfacial energy of the synthetic system.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Full Papers
    1. High-Temperature Operating Non-volatile Memory of Printable Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Self-Assembled with a Conjugate Block Copolymer (pages 831–837)

      Sun Kak Hwang, Jae Ryung Choi, Insung Bae, Ihn Hwang, Suk Man Cho, June Huh and Cheolmin Park

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202038

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Printable non-volatile polymer memories are fabricated with solution-processed nanocomposite films of poly(styrene-block-paraphenylene) (PS-b-PPP) and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The devices show stable data retention at high temperatures of up to 100 °C without significant performance degradation due to the strong, non-destructive, and isomorphic π–π interactions between the SWNTs and PPP block.

    2. A Versatile Toolbox for Multiplexed Protein Micropatterning by Laser Lithography (pages 838–845)

      Mihaela Gropeanu, Maniraj Bhagawati, Radu A. Gropeanu, Gemma M. Rodríguez Muñiz, Subramanian Sundaram, Jacob Piehler and Aránzazu del Campo

      Article first published online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201901

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      Photocleavable oligohistidine peptides are synthesized for improved caging of tris-NTA-functionalized surfaces by multivalent interaction with complexed Ni(II) ions. Efficient photocleavage of these peptides by a confocal laser beam allows capturing of His-tagged proteins into microstructures under physiological conditions. By combination with an enzymatic transfer reaction, stable multiplexed protein arrays are generated.

    3. Features of Transport in Ultrathin Gold Nanowire Structures (pages 846–852)

      Sergii Pud, Alexandre Kisner, Marc Heggen, Dagmawi Belaineh, Ruslan Temirov, Ulrich Simon, Andreas Offenhäusser, Yulia Mourzina and Svetlana Vitusevich

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202197

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The contact interface between large metal electrodes and ultrathin gold nanowires produced from a chemical synthesis is investigated and demonstrates that the conduction through this junction is influenced by physisorbed molecules on the nanowire. The electrical transport mechanism through the interface electrode-nanowires is explained in frame of thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling theory and confirmed by electron microscopy measurements.

    4. Shuttle-Mediated Nanoparticle Delivery to the Blood–Brain Barrier (pages 853–862)

      Daniela Guarnieri, Annarita Falanga, Ornella Muscetti, Rossella Tarallo, Sabato Fusco, Massimiliano Galdiero, Stefania Galdiero and Paolo A. Netti

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201870

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      The effect of a Herpes simplex type 1 viral fusion peptide (gH625) on brain endothelium uptake and crossing of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles and the underlying mechanism are described. This strategy may pave the way to design promising carriers for drug delivery across the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases.

    5. High-Sensitivity Real-Time Analysis of Nanoparticle Toxicity in Green Fluorescent Protein-Expressing Zebrafish (pages 863–869)

      Yu Pan, Annika Leifert, Michael Graf, Frank Schiefer, Sven Thoröe-Boveleth, Janine Broda, Mary C. Halloran, Henner Hollert, Dominic Laaf, Ulrich Simon and Willi Jahnen-Dechent

      Article first published online: 12 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201173

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      Ultrasmall triphenylphosphine-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP) continuously generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing cell stress. This triggers a heat shock response readily detected in vivo using hsp70-GFP reporter zebrafish. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is continuously expressed in the eyes, even in the absence of toxic stress.

    6. Highly Selective Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes by Using Poly(phenyleneethynylene)-Guided Supermolecular Assembly (pages 870–875)

      Yusheng Chen, Yongqian Xu, Qiuming Wang, Rosi N. Gunasinghe, Xiao-Qian Wang and Yi Pang

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202103

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      Folding of a poly(phenyleneethynylene) chain gives a helical conformation, which can be used to sort single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by their diameters. The formed supermolecular assembly places the polymer chain segments in a unique array, whose electronic interaction with SWNTs facilitates the selective dispersion of SWNT (6,5).

    7. Characterizing the Lateral Friction of Nanoparticles on On-Chip Integrated Black Lipid Membranes (pages 876–884)

      Tianhong Chen and Björn M. Reinhard

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202005

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      The diffusion behavior of gold nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with different surface chemistries on black lipid membranes is investigated by dark-field microscopy. NPs tethered in close vicinity to the membrane exhibit a substantial lateral frictional drag that reduces their lateral mobility. The membrane model system facilitates a systematic investigation of the influence of NP size, shape, charge, and surface composition on the lateral mobility.

    8. Three-Dimensional Exploration and Mechano-Biophysical Analysis of the Inner Structure of Living Cells (pages 885–893)

      Álvaro Barroso, Mike Woerdemann, Angelika Vollmer, Gert von Bally, Björn Kemper and Cornelia Denz

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201851

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      The complementary features of holographic optical tweezers and digital holographic microscopy are combined to track in three dimensions the optically induced movement of probe microspheres within living cells. Moreover, the capability of this approach to detect changes of the inner cell structure during cell swelling provoked by osmosis is shown.

    9. Non-ionic Dendronized Multiamphiphilic Polymers as Nanocarriers for Biomedical Applications (pages 894–904)

      Shilpi Gupta, Boris Schade, Sumit Kumar, Christoph Böttcher, Sunil K. Sharma and Rainer Haag

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201253

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      A new class of non-ionic dendronized multiamphiphilic polymers from a biodegradable (AB)n-type diblock polymer is synthesized using Novozym-435 as biocatalyst. These polymers are functionalized with dendritic polyglycerols and octadecyl chains via click chemistry to generate dendronized multiamphiphilic polymers, which self-assemble in aqueous media. This new family of highly biocompatible non-ionic dendronized multiamphiphilic polymers represents an interesting novel platform for the development of nanocarriers for biomedical applications.

    10. Facile and Clean Release of Vertical Si Nanowires by Wet Chemical Etching Based on Alkali Hydroxides (pages 905–912)

      Sung-Soo Yoon and Dahl-Young Khang

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201804

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      Vertical arrays of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) prepared by metal-assisted chemical etching can be cleanly etch-released off the substrate by wet chemical etching based on alkali hydroxides such as NaOH and KOH. Passivating oxide formed on the SiNWs plays a key role of protection during the release-etching process. The released SiNWs are useful for nanoelectronics or composites with other functional materials.

    11. Transparent Plasmonic Nanowire Electrodes via Self-Organised Ion Beam Nanopatterning (pages 913–919)

      Daniele Chiappe, Andrea Toma and Francesco Buatier de Mongeot

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201146

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      A self-organised approach for the synthesis of transparent metal nanowire arrays based on defocused ion beam sputtering is reported. The nanowire arrays feature a dual functionality: they exhibit anisotropic conductivity, with sheet resistances which are strongly reduced in comparison to the transparent conductive oxides, and additionally support localised plasmon resonances, an appealing property in view of photon harvesting applications.

    12. A Peptide Nanofibrous Indicator for Eye-Detectable Cancer Cell Identification (pages 920–926)

      Chang-Sheng Chen, Xiao-Ding Xu, Ya Wang, Juan Yang, Hui-Zhen Jia, Han Cheng, Chih-Chang Chu, Ren-Xi Zhuo and Xian-Zheng Zhang

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201928

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      Naked-eye judgment of cancer cells with a peptide nanofibrous indicator (NFI) is demonstrated. The NFI is achieved by integrating a borono-peptide (BP) and a catechol dye through specific interaction and self-assembly. The NFI interacts with cell-surface overexpressed sialyl Lewis X (sLex) and is capable of distinguishing cancerous and healthy cells through a macroscopic color change.

    13. High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Performance of Individual Gold Nanoflowers and Their Application in Live Cell Imaging (pages 927–932)

      Qi Li, Yuanyuan Jiang, Rongcheng Han, Xiaolan Zhong, Siyun Liu, Zhi-Yuan Li, Yinlin Sha and Dongsheng Xu

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201065

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      Individual flower-like gold nanoparticles show strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering performance with an enhancement factor of 108 and the enhancement is independent of the polarization of the excitation laser. After capping with Raman signal molecules and folic acid, the gold nanoflowers show strong Raman signal in the living cells, excellent targeting properties, and a high signal-to-noise ratio for SERS imaging.

    14. DNA Hairpin Stabilization on a Hydrophobic Surface (pages 933–941)

      Mark Kastantin and Daniel K. Schwartz

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201202335

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      Single-molecule tracking at the solid–liquid interface is used to measure rates of conformational change in single-stranded DNA molecules that can undergo hairpin-coil transitions. Relative to a model hydrophobic surface (TMS), an oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) surface significantly slows the coil-to-hairpin (i.e., folding) rate while increasing the hairpin-to-coil (i.e., unfolding) rate. These results indicate that hydrophobic surface coatings better promote DNA hybridization.

    15. Microstructured, Functional PVA Hydrogels through Bioconjugation with Oligopeptides under Physiological Conditions (pages 942–950)

      Siow-Feng Chong, Anton A. A. Smith and Alexander N. Zelikin

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201774

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      Peptide-functionalized, microstructured biointerfaces based on PVA physical hydrogels are designed herein via a combination of innovative macromolecular design, polymer–peptide conjugation, and microtransfer molding techniques for potential use as substrates for cell culture and tissue engineering.

    16. Magnetic Graphitic Nanocapsules for Programmed DNA Fishing and Detection (pages 951–957)

      Zhi-Ling Song, Xu-Hua Zhao, Wei-Na Liu, Ding Ding, Xia Bian, Hao Liang, Xiao-Bing Zhang, Zhuo Chen and Weihong Tan

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/smll.201201975

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      A core–shell magnetic graphitic nanocapsule (MGN) nanomaterial is synthesized and its capabilities for biomolecule detection are investigated. The MGN combines the unique properties of graphene and magnetic particles into one simple and sensitive biosensing platform, which could quench around 98% of the dye fluorescence within minutes. Based on a programmed multipurpose DNA capturing and releasing strategy, the MGN sensing platform demonstrates outstanding capacity to fish, enrich, and detect DNA.

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