Journal of Software: Evolution and Process

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 2

Special Issue: International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE 2009)

March 2012

Volume 24, Issue 2

Pages 115–229

Issue edited by: Ita Richardson, Dan Paulish, June Verner

  1. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorials
    3. Special Issue Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Research directions for global software engineering—where to next? (pages 115–117)

      Ita Richardson, Dan Paulish and June Verner

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.513

  2. Special Issue Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorials
    3. Special Issue Papers
    1. Propinquity in global software engineering: examining perceived distance in globally distributed project teams (pages 119–137)

      Rafael Prikladnicki

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.475

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      In social psychology, propinquity refers to the physical (objective) or psychological (subjective) proximity between people. In this paper we explore the psychological dimension of propinquity by presenting a model to assess and make more visible the construct of ‘perceived distance’ in the context of distributed software teams. The model was applied in three real-world cases and in most of the projects evaluated, project managers were not expecting the results found. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    2. Knowledge sharing practices and the impact of cultural factors: reflections on two case studies of offshoring in SME (pages 139–152)

      Alexander Boden, Gabriela Avram, Liam Bannon and Volker Wulf

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.473

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      The impact of culture on knowledge sharing in international teams is an important topic which is still not well understood. Based on two case studies, we show that the influences of national culture and site-specific organizational culture are subtle and not easy to separate from other factors. Hence, in order to achieve an accurate understanding of knowledge sharing practices in globally distributed software teams, these need to be studied in context, longitudinally, and from both the onshore and the offshore perspectives. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    3. The impact of geographic distribution and the nature of technical coupling on the quality of global software development projects (pages 153–168)

      Marcelo Cataldo and Sangeeth Nambiar

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.477

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      We studied the impact of multiple dimensions of geographic distribution and the nature of technical coupling on the software quality in 189 software projects. Our analyses revealed two important results. First, projects with uneven distributions of developers across locations were more likely to exhibit higher levels of defects than those projects with balanced distributions. Second, logical dependencies among architectural components, and in particular those that crossed project boundaries, had a significantly more important role on the software quality than syntactic dependencies. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    4. Quality indicators on global software development projects: does ‘getting to know you’ really matter? (pages 169–184)

      Olly Gotel, Vidya Kulkarni, Moniphal Say, Christelle Scharff and Thanwadee Sunetnanta

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.474

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      The value of socialization training on global software development projects is debatable. Does getting to know those you are working with really matter when it comes to the quality of the software that is produced? This paper describes how working in a global setting with people you take the time to know and learn about does matter and provides for a leading quality indicator. It also offers simple exercises for others to replicate to gain insight and prompt behavioral changes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    5. Fear and distrust in global software engineering projects (pages 185–205)

      Arttu Piri, Tuomas Niinimäki and Casper Lassenius

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.476

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      This article describes the emergence of fear and distrust in intra-organizationally distributed global software engineering (GSE) projects suffering from opportunism toward global sourcing. Based on the theories of trust, the article discusses on the cognitive roots of distrust in GSE projects and how concerns related to own professional future can cause distrust between the project employees. The article describes the consequences of fear and distrust, and the principles supporting the creation of sustainable social relations in GSE projects. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    6. A framework for groupware-supported software architecture evaluation process in global software development (pages 207–229)

      Muhammad Ali Babar

      Version of Record online: 8 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.478

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      This paper presents a framework for supporting the software architecture evaluation process using a groupware system. The framework highlights changes that are required in the existing software architecture evaluation methods. We provide an illustrated example of modeling and mapping the activities of the presented process on electronic workspaces. We also identify some of the features a groupware system should provide to successfully support the process. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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