Journal of Software: Evolution and Process

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 5

Special Issue: Software, Systems and Services Process Improvement (EuroSPI 2009)

August 2012

Volume 24, Issue 5

Pages 455–601

Issue edited by: Miklós Biró, Richard Messnarz

  1. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorials
    3. Special Issue Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  2. Special Issue Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorials
    3. Special Issue Papers
    1. Software disasters—understanding the past, to improve the future (pages 459–470)

      Patricia A. McQuaid

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.500

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      Over the years, there have been several major software disasters, resulting from poor software project management, poor risk assessment, and poor development and testing practices. The results of the disasters range from project delays, project cancellations, loss of millions of dollars of equipment, to human fatalities. This paper examines three major failures, plus introduces a model to analyze these types of accidents, so that we can remember these software disasters, learn from them, and not repeat the mistakes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    2. Make test process assessment similar to software process assessment—the Test SPICE approach (pages 471–480)

      Michael Steiner, Monique Blaschke, Michael Philipp and Tomas Schweigert

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.507

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      Test SPICE is the first Test Process Assessment Model that fulfills the Requirements of ISO/IEC 15504. Test SPICE is also aligned to the best practices of ISTQB. The main advantage of Test SPICE is the support of a consistent understanding of process maturity of a complete software developing servicing and testing organization. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    3. Managing the software process with a software process improvement tool in a small enterprise (pages 481–491)

      Iván García, Carla Pacheco, Eloy Mendoza, Jose A. Calvo-Manzano, Gonzalo Cuevas and Tomás San Feliu

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.504

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      The main objective of this paper is to show that a Small Enterprise may use a Web-based Tool, called SysProVal, using the CMMI-DEV model as a framework in order to strengthen project management practices, improve the project performance, and achieve higher CMMI-DEV capability levels. The tool is composed of three main interfaces according to the main users (only top management—top management interface, only project managers—project manager interface, and top management and project managers—SysProVal interface). Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    4. Lessons learned from an ISO/IEC 15504 SPI programme in a company (pages 493–500)

      Antonia Mas, Bartomeu Fluxà and Esperança Amengual

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.501

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      A satisfactory experience which has motivated other companies to participate in new software process improvement programmes. All the companies consider that the implementation of a common set of best practices means competitive advantage. The standardization of the knowledge allows the collaboration among small companies to afford global, ambitious and competitive projects. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    5. Additional requirements for process assessment in safety–critical software and systems domain (pages 501–510)

      Mika Johansson and Risto Nevalainen

      Version of Record online: 20 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.499

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      Certification of safety-critical software is a multi-disciplinary topic, including process assessment and product evaluation as the main topics. Process assessment is possible to adapt and evolve, so that it directly supports both qualification and certification by collecting and analysing process-related evidences systematically. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    6. Methodology for process improvement through basic components and focusing on the resistance to change (pages 511–523)

      Jose A. Calvo-Manzano, Gonzalo Cuevas, Gerzón Gómez, Jezreel Mejia, Mirna Muñoz and Tomás San Feliu

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.505

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      MIGME-RRC methodology shows that beginning a process improvement by identifying the organization's best practices and involving the relevant stakeholders has allowed extracting, collecting and formalizing the tacit knowledge of the organization. Having the knowledge in a formal way, it is possible to select of a multi-model environment the external best practices based on the way the organization works. Thus, it reduces the staff's resistance to change when implementing process improvement, because they perceive the change as an evolution of their work. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    7. The SPI manifesto and the ECQA SPI manager certification scheme (pages 525–540)

      Morten Korsaa, Miklos Biro, Richard Messnarz, Jörn Johansen, Detlef Vohwinkel, Risto Nevalainen and Tomas Schweigert

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.502

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      The SPI manifesto states what is really important in process improvement, and the SPI manager certification provides the skills it takes to make the change. A powerful combination for process improvement. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    8. Improving the software development for multiple projects by applying a platform strategy for mechatronic systems (pages 541–549)

      Volver Bachmann and Richard Messnarz

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.495

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      In the automotive industry product complexity is increasing exponentially and many variants of the same product are maintained in the market (Figure taken from Alexander Poth, SPI of the requirements engineering process for embedded systems using SPICE. Software Process Improvement and Practice 2007; 12(6):505–610). It is a key skill of big automotive companies to manage a professional traceable product and functional architecture which assures a high automotive SPICE capability level in all variants as well. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    9. Process and product innovation needs integrated engineering collaboration skills (pages 551–560)

      Andreas Riel, Anca Draghici, George Draghici, Damian Grajewski and Richard Messnarz

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.497

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      This paper elaborates the importance of integrated engineering collaboration skills in the context of innovative product development. It is based on experiences collected from international partners in a European project that has created a set of competences that characterize the profile of Engineers who know how to conceive and design products and systems in an integrated way. It also points out that advanced visualization and prototyping technologies have an increasingly important role in facilitating the integration and close collaboration of stakeholders. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    10. An agile process model for product derivation in software product line engineering (pages 561–571)

      Pádraig O'Leary, Fergal McCaffery, Steffen Thiel and Ita Richardson

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.498

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      Software Product Lines (SPL) and Agile practices have emerged as new paradigms for developing software. Integrating Agile practices into SPL can bring a balance between agility and formalism. This paper investigates the integration of Agile approaches in the derivation of product from a software product line. The paper presents an outline of an Agile process model for product derivation that was developed through industry-based case study research. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    11. KASL-II: a dynamic four-loop model for knowledge sharing and learning (pages 573–583)

      Elli Georgiadou and Kerstin V. Siakas

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.503

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      Organizational knowledge is by far the most valuable resource. Organizations need to find ways for efficient and effective knowledge sharing. This paper explores the barriers to knowledge sharing especially in virtual and multicultural teams., particularly unfolding the human and cultural challenges that can create added competitive value for virtual and networked organizations. A dynamic knowledge acquisition and sharing lifecycle (KASL-II) model for aiding knowledge sharing is proposed, showing the stages of translating an organization's mission and goals into objectives, and how decisions and actions operate for materialising these objectives. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    12. Measurement and quantification are not the same: ISO 15939 and ISO 9126 (pages 585–601)

      Alain Abran, Jean-Marc Desharnais and Juan Jose Cuadrado-Gallego

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/smr.496

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      Measurement based on international standards for measurement is not the same as judgmental-based quantification of implicit relationships across a mix of entities and attributes without due consideration of admissible mathematical operations on numbers of different scale types. This paper presents first the Measurement Information Model in ISO 15939 and clarifies what in it refers to the classical metrology field, and what refers to quantitative analysis of relationships. Two examples of the designs of a measure for ISO 9126 are presented, one focusing on a single attribute and the second attempting to quantify a set of relationships across a number of entities and attributes. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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