The Sociological Review Monographs

Cover image for Vol. 64 Issue 1

Sociological Review Monograph Series: Biosocial Matters: Rethinking Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century

March 2016

Volume 64, Issue 1

Pages 1–283

Issue edited by: Maurizio Meloni, Simon Williams, Paul Martin

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. Issue Information - TOC (pages 1–6)

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12026

  2. Editorial introduction

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The biosocial: sociological themes and issues (pages 7–25)

      Maurizio Meloni, Simon Williams and Paul Martin

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12010

  3. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. Cultural epigenetics (pages 42–60)

      Eva Jablonka

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12012

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    3. The social as signal in the body of chromatin (pages 79–99)

      Hannah Landecker

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12014

  4. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. The turn to biology (pages 117–133)

      Tim Newton

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12016

  5. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. Social epigenetics: a science of social science? (pages 168–185)

      Emma Chung, John Cromby, Dimitris Papadopoulos and Cristina Tufarelli

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12019

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Living well in the Neuropolis (pages 221–237)

      Des Fitzgerald, Nikolas Rose and Ilina Singh

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12022

  6. Notes on Contributors

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. Notes on contributors (pages 274–278)

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12027

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial introduction
    4. Rise of the new biology: implications for the social sciences
    5. Thinking biosocially: promises, problems, prospects
    6. Biosocial challenges and opportunities: epigenetics and neuroscience
    7. Notes on Contributors
    8. Index
    1. Index (pages 279–283)

      Version of Record online: 21 APR 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/2059-7932.12028

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION