Hydrogen Softening in the Thin Plate of Microcrystalline 316L Stainless Steel

Authors

  • Yunsung Kim,

    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
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  • Dongjun Shin,

    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
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  • Youngsuk Kim,

    1. Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353, Republic of Korea
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  • Dae Whan Kim,

    1. Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353, Republic of Korea
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  • Sungsoo Kim,

    1. Nuclear Materials Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353, Republic of Korea
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  • Wonjong Nam,

    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
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  • Yong-Suk Kim,

    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
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  • Kristián Máthis,

    1. Department of Physics of Materials, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague, Czech Republic
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  • Heeman Choe

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
    • School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Jeongneung-Ro 77, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-702, Republic of Korea
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Abstract

The thin-plate specimen of 316L austenite stainless steel was charged with hydrogen using a cathodic charging technique. Despite the short diffusion distance of hydrogen predicted by the diffusion-controlled model for a semi-infinite sheet, the Vickers hardness measurements revealed the full effect of hydrogen in the center of the cross-sections of thin-plate specimens as well as in the vicinity of the outer surfaces, which appears to be due to the short-circuit diffusion mechanism along the grain boundaries. The room-temperature tensile properties of both undeformed and deformed (20, 40%) samples were examined and compared. Hydrogen softening was apparent in both types of samples. For example, the 40% deformed sample showed an approximately 17 and 7% lower yield and tensile strength, respectively, after H charging at a strain rate of 2 × 10−4 s−1 with a concomitant decrease in ductility compared to that without H.

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