On the estimation of survival

Authors

  • Donald Earl Henson MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Early Detection Branch Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Early Detection Branch, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza North, Rm. 305, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892
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  • Lynn A. Gloeckler Ries MS

    1. Cancer Statistics Branch Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
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Abstract

The advantages and disadvantages of the different methods for calculating survival according to the TNM (Topography, Lymph Node, and Metastasis) are described. Methods include the observed, relative, and conditional survival rates. For large cohorts, relative survival calculated by the life table method is most useful. Conditional survival, which requires long-term follow-up, is clinically the most informative. In addition, follow-up methods employed by tumor registries are considered. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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