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Keywords:

  • Cox proportional hazards model;
  • survival;
  • survival rate;
  • cancer;
  • all sites

Abstract

The prognostic impact of FIGO stage, histology, histologic grade, age and race in survival for cancers of the female gynecological (cervix, endometrium, ovary, vulva, vagina) were examined using cases obtained from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program that were diagnosed between 1973 and 1987. Utilizing Cox proportional hazards modeling and relative survival rates analysis of 17,119 cases of cervical cancer indicated that the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, histology, histological grade, lymph node status, and age at diagnosis were all independently prognostic. No evidence was found of survival differences between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Younger women were not found to have a poorer prognosis, survival declined with increased age. Analysis of 41,120 cases of endometrial cancer indicated that FIGO stage, histology, histologic grade, lymph node status, age at diagnostic, and race were all prognostic factors. Clear cell adenocarcinoma, leiomyosarcoma, and mixed mullerian tumors were all found to have poorer prognosis. Analysis of 21,240 cases of ovarian cancer indicated that FIGO stage, histology, histologic grade, lymph node status, age at diagnosis, presence of ascites, and race were all prognostically significant. Analysis of 2,575 cases of vulvar cancer indicated that FIGO stage, histology, histologic grade, age, and race were all prognostically significant. Analysis of 916 cases of vaginal cancer indicated that FIGO stage, histologic grade, lymph node status, and age are all prognostically significant. Additional analysis of the data by combinations of independent prognostic factors indicates that the interaction of factors may be more predictive of outcome than any one factor separately. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.1