Concise Review: Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury§

Authors

  • Dunja Lukovic,

    1. CABIMER (Centro Andaluz de Biología Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa), Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, Parque Científico y Tecnológico Cartuja, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Victoria Moreno Manzano,

    1. Neural Regeneration Lab, Centro de Investigación “Principe Felipe,” Valencia, Spain
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  • Miodrag Stojkovic,

    1. Spebo Medical, Leskovac, Serbia
    2. Human Genetics Department, Medical Faculty, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
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  • Shom Shanker Bhattacharya,

    1. CABIMER (Centro Andaluz de Biología Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa), Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, Parque Científico y Tecnológico Cartuja, Sevilla, Spain
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  • Slaven Erceg

    Corresponding author
    1. CABIMER (Centro Andaluz de Biología Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa), Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, Parque Científico y Tecnológico Cartuja, Sevilla, Spain
    2. Medical Genome Project, Edificio INSUR, Parque Científico y Tecnológico Cartuja, Sevilla, Spain
    • CABIMER (Centro Andaluz de Biología Molecular y Medicina Regenerativa), Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, Parque Científico y Tecnológico Cartuja, Sevilla, Spain
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    • Telephone: +34 954 468 004; Fax: +34 954 461 664


  • Author contributions: D.L.: conception and design, data analysis and interpretation, and manuscript writing.; V.M.-M.: perform experiments; S.S.B. and M.S.: conception and design, manuscript writing, and final approval of manuscript; S.E.: conception and design, data analysis and interpretation, manuscript writing, final approval of manuscript, and perform experiments and graphic design.

  • Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  • §

    First published online in STEM CELLSEXPRESS June 26, 2012.

Abstract

Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Different kinds of cells including embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells have been transplanted into animal models of SCI resulting in sensorimotor benefits. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)- or induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neural cells is nowadays a promising therapy for SCI. This review updates the recent progress in preclinical studies and discusses the advantages and flaws of various neural cell types derived from hESCs and hiPSCs. Before introducing the stem cell replacement strategies in clinical practice, this complex field needs to advance significantly in understanding the lesion itself, the animal model adequacy, and improve cell replacement source. This knowledge will contribute to the successful translation from animals to humans and lead to established guidelines for rigorous safety screening in order to be implemented in clinical practice. Stem Cells2012;30:1787–1792

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