Epidermal Growth Factor Induces the Progeny of Subventricular Zone Type B Cells to Migrate and Differentiate into Oligodendrocytes

Authors

  • Oscar Gonzalez-Perez,

    1. Department of Neurological Surgery, Brain Tumor Research Center, Institute for Regeneration Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
    2. Laboratory of Neuroscience, School of Psychology, University of Colima, Colima, Mexico
    3. Neuroscience Department, CUCS, University of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Mexico
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  • Ricardo Romero-Rodriguez,

    1. Department of Neurological Surgery, Brain Tumor Research Center, Institute for Regeneration Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
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  • Mario Soriano-Navarro,

    1. Laboratorio de Morfología Celular, Unidad Mixta CIPF-UVEG, CIBERNED, Spain
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  • Jose Manuel Garcia-Verdugo,

    1. Laboratorio de Morfología Celular, Unidad Mixta CIPF-UVEG, CIBERNED, Spain
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  • Arturo Alvarez-Buylla

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurological Surgery, Brain Tumor Research Center, Institute for Regeneration Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
    • Department of Neurosurgery and Institute for Regeneration Medicine; University of California, San Francisco; Box 0525; San Francisco, CA 94143; USA
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Epidermal Growth Factor Induces the Progeny of Subventricular Zone Type B Cells to Migrate and Differentiate into Oligodendrocytes Volume 27, Issue 12, 3122, Article first published online: 14 December 2009

  • Author contributions: O.G.-P.: conception and design, collection and assembly of data, data analysis and interpretation, manuscript writing; R.R.-R. and M.S.-N.: collection and assembly of data; J.M.G.-V.: collection and assembly of data, data analysis and interpretation; A.A.-B.: conception and design, financial support, manuscript writing.

  • First published online in STEM CELLS EXPRESS May 14, 2009.

Abstract

New neurons and oligodendrocytes are continuously produced in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mammalian brains. Under normal conditions, the SVZ primary precursors (type B1 cells) generate type C cells, most of which differentiate into neurons, with a small subpopulation giving rise to oligodendrocytes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling induces dramatic proliferation and migration of SVZ progenitors, a process that could have therapeutic applications. However, the fate of cells derived from adult neural stem cells after EGF stimulation remains unknown. Here, we specifically labeled SVZ B1 cells and followed their progeny after a 7-day intraventricular infusion of EGF. Cells derived from SVZ B1 cells invaded the parenchyma around the SVZ into the striatum, septum, corpus callosum, and fimbria-fornix. Most of these B1-derived cells gave rise to cells in the oligodendrocyte lineage, including local NG2+ progenitors, and premyelinating and myelinating oligodendrocytes. SVZ B1 cells also gave rise to a population of highly-branched S100β+/glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)+ cells in the striatum and septum, but no neuronal differentiation was observed. Interestingly, when demyelination was induced in the corpus callosum by a local injection of lysolecithin, an increased number of cells derived from SVZ B1 cells and stimulated to migrate and proliferate by EGF infusion differentiated into oligodendrocytes at the lesion site. This work indicates that EGF infusion can greatly expand the number of progenitors derived from the SVZ primary progenitors which migrate and differentiate into oligodendroglial cells. This expanded population could be used for the repair of white matter lesions. STEM CELLS 2009;27:2032–2043

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