• Open Access

Concise Review: Preclinical Studies on Human Cell-Based Therapy in Rodent Ischemic Stroke Models: Where Are We Now after a Decade?§

Authors

  • Wai Khay Leong,

    1. Centre for Stem Cell Research, The Robinson Institute, South Australia, Australia
    2. School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, South Australia, Australia
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  • Martin D. Lewis,

    1. Centre for Stem Cell Research, The Robinson Institute, South Australia, Australia
    2. School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, South Australia, Australia
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  • Simon A. Koblar

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    2. Centre for Stem Cell Research, The Robinson Institute, South Australia, Australia
    • Stroke Research Program, School of Medicine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia
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    • Telephone: +61 8 8222 6740 (Office), +61 4 1692 8658 (Mobile); Fax: +61 8 8222 6042


  • Author contributions: W.K.L.: conception and design, collection and assembly of data, data analysis and interpretation, and manuscript writing; M.L.: conception and design, financial support, manuscript writing, and final approval of manuscript; S.K.: conception and design, financial support, data analysis and interpretation, manuscript writing, and final approval of manuscript.

  • Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  • §

    first published online in STEM CELLS EXPRESS February 6, 2013.

Abstract

Stroke, a debilitating brain insult, afflicts millions of individuals globally each year. In the last decade, researchers have investigated cell-based therapy as an alternative strategy to improve neurological outcome following stroke. This concise review critically examines preclinical reports using human adult and fetal stem/progenitor cells in rodent models of ischemic stroke. As we enter the second decade of study, we should aim to optimize our collective likelihood to translational success for stroke victims worldwide. We advocate international consensus recommendations be developed for future preclinical research. STEM Cells 2013;31:1040–1043

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