SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article.

FilenameFormatSizeDescription
sc-12-1072_sm_SupplAppendix1a.mov64329KVideo 1. Ultrasound-based in vivo injection of human fetal ECFCs into the mouse fetal circulation. After maternal anaesthesia fetuses were identified (A), and with full vital monitoring, a 32G needle (arrow) attached to a syringe containing ECFCs was sonographically guided through the maternal skin, peritoneum, uterine wall and amniotic sac to perforate the sternal surface of the fetal chest and wall of the cardiac ventricle (B). Once in position, the aortic arch was visualized in the oblique plane and the content of the syringe slowly injected into the ventricle. Following ventricular contractions, the echo-dense (yellow arrow) cell suspension is visible jetting into the aortic arch (blue arrow) on its way to the fetal circulation (C).
sc-12-1072_sm_SupplAppendix1B.mov68714KVideo 1. Ultrasound-based in vivo injection of human fetal ECFCs into the mouse fetal circulation. After maternal anaesthesia fetuses were identified (A), and with full vital monitoring, a 32G needle (arrow) attached to a syringe containing ECFCs was sonographically guided through the maternal skin, peritoneum, uterine wall and amniotic sac to perforate the sternal surface of the fetal chest and wall of the cardiac ventricle (B). Once in position, the aortic arch was visualized in the oblique plane and the content of the syringe slowly injected into the ventricle. Following ventricular contractions, the echo-dense (yellow arrow) cell suspension is visible jetting into the aortic arch (blue arrow) on its way to the fetal circulation (C).
sc-12-1072_sm_SupplAppendix1C.mov65997KVideo 1. Ultrasound-based in vivo injection of human fetal ECFCs into the mouse fetal circulation. After maternal anaesthesia fetuses were identified (A), and with full vital monitoring, a 32G needle (arrow) attached to a syringe containing ECFCs was sonographically guided through the maternal skin, peritoneum, uterine wall and amniotic sac to perforate the sternal surface of the fetal chest and wall of the cardiac ventricle (B). Once in position, the aortic arch was visualized in the oblique plane and the content of the syringe slowly injected into the ventricle. Following ventricular contractions, the echo-dense (yellow arrow) cell suspension is visible jetting into the aortic arch (blue arrow) on its way to the fetal circulation (C).
sc-12-1072_sm_SupplAppendix2.mov8501KVideo 2. A series of real-time in vivo optical sequences of the mouse uterine microvasculature infiltrated by transmigratory fetal cells. The eGFP-expressing fetal cells (bright green), generated by transgenic/native cross-matings, are shown as clusters/colonies (yellow arrows) aligning the microvascular lumina. The colonies are fixed within the vessel walls, unperturbed by maternal blood flow (red arrows).
sc-12-1072_sm_SupplAppendix3.mov7404KAppendix 3. In vivo images of pregnant uteri of NOD/SCID mice whose fetuses were transplanted with human fetal eGFP-ECFCs. Transmigratory cells are subsequently observed at different magnifications, singularly or in clusters, aligning the maternal uterine microvascular lumina (yellow arrows). These cells, fixed within the vascular walls, remain static in the presence of moving maternal blood (red arrows).

Please note: Wiley Blackwell is not responsible for the content or functionality of any supporting information supplied by the authors. Any queries (other than missing content) should be directed to the corresponding author for the article.