Concise Review: Understanding Clonal Dynamics in Homeostasis and Injury Through Multicolor Lineage Tracing

Authors

  • Edwige Roy,

    1. Experimental Dermatology Group, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
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  • Zoltan Neufeld,

    1. Department of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
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  • Jean Livet,

    1. INSERM U968, Paris, France
    2. Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris, Institut de la Vision, Paris, France
    3. CNRS UMR_7210, Paris, France
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  • Kiarash Khosrotehrani

    Corresponding author
    1. Experimental Dermatology Group, UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    2. Experimental Dermatology Group, UQ Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    • Correspondence: Kiarash Khosrotehrani, M.D., Ph.D., F.A.C.D., Centre for Clinical Research, Royal Brisbane Hospital Building 71/918, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4029, Australia. Telephone: 61-73346-6077; Fax: 61-73346-5598; e-mail: k.khosrotehrani@uq.edu.au

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Abstract

Lineage tracing is an essential tool to study stem cell fate. Although traditional lineage tracing techniques have considerably advanced our understanding of stem cell behavior, they pose significant limitations for identification and longitudinal tracking of the progeny of individual stem cells, to compare their behaviors. This is of importance given the well-established heterogeneity among stem cells both in terms of potentialities and proliferative capacities. The recent development of multicolor genetic reporters addressable to specific cell populations largely overcomes these issues. These new “rainbow” technologies provide increased resolution in clonal identification and offer the possibility to study the relative distribution, contacts, tiled arrangement, and competitive interactions among cells or groups of cells of the same type. Stem Cells 2014;32:3046–3054

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