Hierarchization of Myogenic and Adipogenic Progenitors Within Human Skeletal Muscle§

Authors

  • Didier F. Pisani,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
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  • Noémie Clement,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
    2. Centre de Référence Maladies Neuromusculaires et de la SLA, CHU de Nice, Nice, France
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  • Agnès Loubat,

    1. Plateforme de Cytométrie, IFR50, Faculté de Médecine, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Nice, France
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  • Magali Plaisant,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
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  • Sabrina Sacconi,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
    2. Centre de Référence Maladies Neuromusculaires et de la SLA, CHU de Nice, Nice, France
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  • Jean-Yves Kurzenne,

    1. Services de Chirurgie Pédiatrique, CHU de Nice, Hôpital l'Archet, Nice, France
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  • Claude Desnuelle,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
    2. Centre de Référence Maladies Neuromusculaires et de la SLA, CHU de Nice, Nice, France
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  • Christian Dani,

    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
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  • Claude A. Dechesne

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, University of Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, UMR6543, Nice, France
    • Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, CNRSUMR6543. Tour Pasteur, 28 avenue Valombrose, 06,107 Nice, France
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    • Telephone: +33493377082; Fax: +33493377058


  • Author contributions: D.F.P. and C.A.D.: collection and/or assembly of data, data analysis and interpretation, manuscript writing, conception and design, final approval of manuscript; C.D.: financial support, administrative support, data analysis and interpretation; N.C., A.L., and M.P.: collection and/or assembly of data; S.S., C.D., and J.Y.K.: collection and/or assembly of data, provision of study material or patients.

  • First published online in STEM CELLS EXPRESS October 8, 2010.

  • §

    Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

Abstract

Skeletal muscle cells constitute a heterogeneous population that maintains muscle integrity through a high myogenic regenerative capacity. More unexpectedly, this population is also endowed with an adipogenic potential, even in humans, and intramuscular adipocytes have been found to be present in several disorders. We tested the distribution of myogenic and adipogenic commitments in human muscle-derived cells to decipher the cellular basis of the myoadipogenic balance. Clonal analysis showed that adipogenic progenitors can be separated from myogenic progenitors and, interestingly, from myoadipogenic bipotent progenitors. These progenitors were isolated in the CD34+ population on the basis of the expression of CD56 and CD15 cell surface markers. In vivo, these different cell types have been found in the interstitial compartment of human muscle. In vitro, we show that the proliferation of bipotent myoadipogenic CD56+CD15+ progenitors gives rise to myogenic CD56+CD15 progenitors and adipogenic CD56CD15+ progenitors. A cellular hierarchy of muscle and fat progenitors thus occurs within human muscle. These results provide cellular bases for adipogenic differentiation in human skeletal muscle, which may explain the fat development encountered in different muscle pathological situations. STEM CELLS 2010;28:2182–2194

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