The Er71 Is an Important Regulator of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Adult Mice§

Authors

  • Dongjun Lee,

    1. National Creative Research Initiatives Center, Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (WCU), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea
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  • Tackhoon Kim,

    1. National Creative Research Initiatives Center, Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (WCU), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea
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  • Dae-Sik Lim

    Corresponding author
    1. National Creative Research Initiatives Center, Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (WCU), Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea
    • Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Nanoscience and Technology (WCU), Biomedical Research Center, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseoung-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701, Korea
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    • Telephone: +82-42-350-2635; Fax: +82-42-350-2610


  • Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  • Author contributions: D.L., collection and assembly of data, manuscript writing; T.K., technical support; D.-S.L., adviser, conception and design, manuscript writing.

  • §

    First published online in STEM CELLSEXPRESS December 29, 2010.

Abstract

The Ets transcription factor Er71 is an important regulator of endothelial and hematopoietic development during mammalian embryogenesis. However, the role of Er71 in adult hematopoiesis has remained unknown. We now first show that conditional deletion of Er71 in the hematopoietic system of adult mice results in a marked reduction (55%) in the number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is likely due to increased cell death. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) experiments further confirmed that Er71 is required for repopulation of HSCs. In addition, Er71+/− mice exhibited a slight decrease (37%) in the number of HSCs than those of Er71+/+ mice, indicating that the function of Er71 in HSC maintenance is dependent on gene dosage. Moreover, Er71 was shown to be required for Tie2 expression, which contributes to HSC maintenance. Our results thus suggest the role of a single transcription factor in controlling HSCs through regulation of Tie2 expression in adult animals. STEM CELLS 2011;29:539–548

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