Concise Review: Making a Retina—From the Building Blocks to Clinical Applications§

Authors

  • Valerie A. Wallace

    Corresponding author
    1. Vision Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Ophthalmology Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario Canada
    3. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario Canada
    • Vision Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6
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    • Telephone: 613-737-8234; Fax: 613-737-8803


  • Author contributions: V.A.W.: manuscript writing and financial support.

  • Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  • §

    First published online in STEM CELLSEXPRESS January 14, 2011; available online without subscription through the open access option.

Abstract

The retina is the neural tissue located at the back of the eye that captures and processes light and transmits this information to visual processing centers in the brain, which enables us to see. Basic research in retinal development has provided important insight on the control of cell fate, proliferation, and neurogenesis in the central nervous system. This review summarizes the major cellular and molecular events that occur during retinal development and highlights how this knowledge may be harnessed for new therapeutic strategies to treat retinal disease. STEM CELLS 2011;29:412–417

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