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Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version of this article.

FilenameFormatSizeDescription
STEM_772_sm_supplTable1.pdf111KSupplementary Table S1: Table of the Ni, Ki, Oi, K'i, Si, Ci parameters in ancestry backgrounds are African Americans (AFA), Hispanic Americans (HIS), American Asians (ASI), and American Europeans (EU). (Excel File)
STEM_772_sm_supplTable2.pdf118KSupplementary Tables S2-S4: View of the haplotype extent of sharing between the most frequent HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 haplotype in Hispanic Americans (S2) Asian Americans (S3), and African Americans (S4) versus other ancestry backgrounds Legend: The four ancestry backgrounds are African Americans (AFA), Hispanic Americans (HIS), American Asians (ASI), and American Europeans (EU). Ranks of the haplotype frequencies in the ancestry background are displayed. NA means that the haplotype was not found in the sample7apos;s estimation, suggesting that if existing in this population the haplotype is very rare. Allele frequencies can be found in Maiers et al. 2008. The HLA nomenclature is as found in the original data and uses the so called Antigen Recognition Site ambiguity system (Human Immunology 2007;68:392-417).
STEM_772_sm_supplTable3.pdf117KSupplementary Tables S2-S4: View of the haplotype extent of sharing between the most frequent HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 haplotype in Hispanic Americans (S2) Asian Americans (S3), and African Americans (S4) versus other ancestry backgrounds Legend: The four ancestry backgrounds are African Americans (AFA), Hispanic Americans (HIS), American Asians (ASI), and American Europeans (EU). Ranks of the haplotype frequencies in the ancestry background are displayed. NA means that the haplotype was not found in the sample7apos;s estimation, suggesting that if existing in this population the haplotype is very rare. Allele frequencies can be found in Maiers et al. 2008. The HLA nomenclature is as found in the original data and uses the so called Antigen Recognition Site ambiguity system (Human Immunology 2007;68:392-417).
STEM_772_sm_supplTable4.pdf116KSupplementary Tables S2-S4: View of the haplotype extent of sharing between the most frequent HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 haplotype in Hispanic Americans (S2) Asian Americans (S3), and African Americans (S4) versus other ancestry backgrounds Legend: The four ancestry backgrounds are African Americans (AFA), Hispanic Americans (HIS), American Asians (ASI), and American Europeans (EU). Ranks of the haplotype frequencies in the ancestry background are displayed. NA means that the haplotype was not found in the sample7apos;s estimation, suggesting that if existing in this population the haplotype is very rare. Allele frequencies can be found in Maiers et al. 2008. The HLA nomenclature is as found in the original data and uses the so called Antigen Recognition Site ambiguity system (Human Immunology 2007;68:392-417).
STEM_772_sm_supplFigure1.tif119KSupplementary Figure S1: Schematic view of how haplo-homozygous iPS cell lines achieve hemi-similarity with the patients by single haplotype match.
STEM_772_sm_supplFigure2.tif223KSupplementary Figure S2: Example of the computation of the parameters in table 1 for the 3 most frequent haplotypes in European population.

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