Synapse

Cover image for Vol. 68 Issue 3

March 2014

Volume 68, Issue 3

Pages spcone–spcone, 89–130

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
      Issue Information (page spcone)

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21705

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. Low brain CB1 receptor occupancy by a second generation CB1 receptor antagonist TM38837 in comparison with rimonabant in nonhuman primates: A PET study (pages 89–97)

      Akihiro Takano, Balázs Gulyás, Katarina Varnäs, Paul Brian Little, Pia K. Noerregaard, Niels Ole Jensen, Christian e. Elling and Christer Halldin

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21721

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) receptor occupancy were measured in nonhuman primates using [11C]MePPEP. TM38837 showed rather lower CB1R occupancy than rimonabant at the expected therapeutic plasma level, which is expected to reduce CNS side effects in clinical situations.

    2. Age-related motor dysfunction and neuropathology in a transgenic mouse model of multiple system atrophy (pages 98–106)

      P.O. Fernagut, W.G. Meissner, M. Biran, M. Fantin, F. Bassil, J.M. Franconi and F. Tison

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21719

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work demonstrates that a genetic mouse model of multiple system atrophy recapitulates some of the progressive features of the disease, including age-related behavioural impairments and brain atrophy, together with a high burden of alpha-synuclein accumulation in the basal ganglia. This study delivers endpoints for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies.

    3. Regional brain imaging of vesicular acetylcholine transporter using o-[125I]iodo-trans-decalinvesamicol as a new potential imaging probe (pages 107–113)

      Takashi Kozaka, Izumi Uno, Yoji Kitamura, Daisuke Miwa, Mohammad Anwar-Ul Azim, Kazuma Ogawa and Kazuhiro Shiba

      Version of Record online: 15 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21720

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We determined the regional rat brain distribution of radio-iodinated o-iodo-trans-decalinvesamicol ([125I]OIDV) in vivo to evaluate its potential as a SPECT imaging probe for vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT).

    4. Rearrangement of the dendritic morphology of the neurons from prefrontal cortex and hippocampus after subthalamic lesion in Sprague–Dawley rats (pages 114–126)

      Israel Camacho-Abrego, Gullermina Tellez-Merlo, Angel I. Melo, Antonio Rodríguez-Moreno, Linda Garcés, Fidel De La Cruz, Sergio Zamudio and Gonzalo Flores

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21722

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We examined the effect of subthalamic lesion in the rat, assessing behavioral and dendritic morphology. Alterations in the dendritic morphology of the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were observed after four weeks of subthalamic damage.

  3. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. Elevated serotonin and 5-HIAA in the brainstem and lower serotonin turnover in the prefrontal cortex of suicides (pages 127–130)

      Helene Bach, Yung-Yu Huang, Mark D. Underwood, Andrew J. Dwork, J. John Mann and Victoria Arango

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/syn.21695

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we find more brainstem 5-HT and 5-HIAA in suicides compared with nonpsychiatric, sudden death controls throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the brainstem DRN and MRN. This suggests that 5-HT synthesis in suicides is greater within all DRN subnuclei and the MRN compared with controls.

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