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The Chemical Record

Cover image for The Chemical Record

2008

Volume 8, Issue 1

Pages 1–65

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      Biochemical and genetic bases of dehalorespiration (pages 1–12)

      Taiki Futagami, Masatoshi Goto and Kensuke Furukawa

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/tcr.20134

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      Dehalorespiration is an anaerobical process using halogenated compounds as the terminal electron acceptors. During this process, halogenated compounds are reductively dehalogenated by the reductive dehalogenase, a key enzyme of dehalorespiration [e.g., perchloroethene (PCE) is successively converted to trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and the nontoxic end product ethene]. Most of reductive dehalogenases exhibit similar features such as the presences of a twin arginine translocation (Tat) signal sequence, two Fe-S clusters, and a corrinoid cofactor.

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      Applications of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) transistors in chemical and biological sensors (pages 13–22)

      Maria Nikolou and George G. Malliaras

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/tcr.20133

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      The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) appears to be one of the most promising transducers for chemical and biological sensor applications. This is due to the enormous potential it presents for facile processing of small, portable, and inexpensive sensors ideally suited for point-of-care analysis. The inherent signal amplification of this device allows for small sample volume and ease of incorporation into circuits. In addition, it operates at low voltages, and its simplified structure can be printed on flexible substrates. These characteristics give the OECTs a unique advantage over other devices. PEDOT:PSS-based OECTs can be used in gaseous or aqueous environments to detect a wide range of target analytes for a variety of possible applications in fields such as health care, environmental monitoring, and food industry.

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      Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry (pages 23–32)

      Totaro Imasaka

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/tcr.20136

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      The analyte was separated by a gas chromatograph and was subsequently introduced into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The molecule was ionized by a laser pulse arising from a tunable optical parametric parameter or a femtosecond laser. The ion was detected by an assembly of microchannel plates for mass analysis.

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      Polyisoprenoid alcohols—Recent results of structural studies (pages 33–45)

      Karolina Skorupinska-Tudek, Jacek Wojcik and Ewa Swiezewska

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/tcr.20137

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      Studies of the structure of polyisoprenoid alcohols have led to the discovery of a new, unique type of polyprenol with the trans configuration of the α-terminal isoprene unit. In parallel, elucidation of the structure of metabolically labeled plant [13C]dolichols has indicated that both the mevalonate and the methylerythritol phosphate pathways are involved in the biosynthesis of dolichols in roots. Putative enzymatic machinery involved in the biosynthesis of polyisoprenoids is discussed.

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      Lactonization-mediated glycosylations and their application to oligosaccharide synthesis (pages 46–65)

      Kwan Soo Kim and Heung Bae Jeon

      Version of Record online: 26 FEB 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/tcr.20138

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      Efficient and stereocontrolled glycosylation methods based on the concept of lactonization-mediated glycosylations such as the 2′-carboxybenzyl (CB) glycoside method, the glycosyl pentenoate/PhSeOTf method, and the glycosyl aryl phthalate method are described. These lactonization-mediated glycosylation methods were applied to the synthesis of complex oligosaccharides of biological significance. Especially, the CB glycoside method has been successfully applied to the synthesis of repeating oligosaccharide subunits of the O-polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from Danish Helicobacter pylori strains and Escherichia coli 077, the synthesis of oligoarabinofuranosides in mycobacterial cell walls, and the total synthesis of antineoplastic agelagalastatin.

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