Rapid vascularization of starch–poly(caprolactone) in vivo by outgrowth endothelial cells in co-culture with primary osteoblasts

Authors

  • Shahram Ghanaati,

    Corresponding author
    1. REPAIR-lab, Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, & European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany
    2. Clinic for Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main, Germany
    • Institute of Pathology, Langenbeckstrasse 1, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55101 Mainz, Germany.
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    • These authors contributed equally to this study.

  • Sabine Fuchs,

    1. REPAIR-lab, Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, & European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany
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    • These authors contributed equally to this study.

  • Matthew J. Webber,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
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  • Carina Orth,

    1. REPAIR-lab, Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, & European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany
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  • Mike Barbeck,

    1. REPAIR-lab, Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, & European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany
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  • Manuela E. Gomes,

    1. 3B's Research Group - Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Dept. of Polymer Eng., Univ. of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4806-909 Taipas, Guimarães, Portugal
    2. IBB–Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, PT Government Associated Laboratory, Guimarães, Portugal
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  • Rui L. Reis,

    1. 3B's Research Group - Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, Dept. of Polymer Eng., Univ. of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4806-909 Taipas, Guimarães, Portugal
    2. IBB–Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, PT Government Associated Laboratory, Guimarães, Portugal
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  • C. James Kirkpatrick

    1. REPAIR-lab, Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, & European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, Langenbeckstrasse 1, D-55101 Mainz, Germany
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Abstract

The successful integration of in vitro-generated tissues is dependent on adequate vascularization in vivo. Human outgrowth endothelial cells (OECs) isolated from the mononuclear cell fraction of peripheral blood represent a potent population of circulating endothelial progenitors that could provide a cell source for rapid anastomosis and scaffold vascularization. Our previous work with these cells in co-culture with primary human osteoblasts has demonstrated their potential to form perfused vascular structures within a starch–poly(caprolactone) biomaterial in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrate the ability of OECs to form perfused vascular structures as early as 48 h following subcutaneous implantation of the biomaterial in vivo. The number of OEC-derived vessels increased throughout the study, an effect that was independent of the OEC donor. This finding of rapid and thorough OEC-mediated scaffold vascularization demonstrates the great potential for OEC-based strategies to promote vascularization in tissue engineering. OECs have the potential to contribute to host-derived scaffold vascularization, and formed vascular structures at a similar density as those arising from the host. Additionally, immunohistochemical evidence demonstrated the close interaction between OECs and the co-cultured osteoblasts. In addition to the known paracrine activity osteoblasts have in modulating angiogenesis of co-cultured OECs, we demonstrate the potential of osteoblasts to provide additional structural support for OEC-derived vessels, perhaps acting in a pericyte-like role. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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