Get access

PFOS and PCB 153 have direct adverse effects on neonatal testis modeled using a coculture of primary gonocyte and sertoli cells

Authors

  • Jie Zhang,

    1. School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jiren Liang,

    1. School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hongyan Zhu,

    1. School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Cuizhen Li,

    1. School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Qing Wu

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    2. Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    • School of Public Health, Fudan University, 130 DongAn Road, Shanghai 200032, China
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is widely used in industry; it is nonbiodegradable and persistent in the human body and in the environment. Although reports have indicated that young people might have higher PFOS levels in serum or blood than do older people, its adverse effects on neonatal testicular cells had not been investigated previously. PCB 153 is one of the most prevalent polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in biological tissues, but the direct adverse effect of PCB 153 on neonatal testis remains unclear. In this study, we exposed a neonatal Sertoli cell/gonocyte coculture system to PFOS and PCB 153 individually at concentrations of 0, 1, 10, 50, and 100 μM for 24 h. Exposure to either compound reduced the cell viability and induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in dose-dependent manners, with PCB 153 having a greater effect than PFOS. Whereas PCB 153 induced apoptosis significantly from 10 μM, PFOS induced no obvious change. Morphologically, both PCB 153 and PFOS induced changes in the vimentin and actin filaments in the Sertoli cells, as investigated using confocal argon ion laser scanning microscopy; here, PFOS exhibited a more dramatic effect than did PCB 153. Furthermore, doses of 50 μM for PFOS and 10 μM for PCB 153 were the key concentrations that produced significant differences between the control and exposure groups. We suggest that both PCB 153 and PFOS directly affect neonatal gonocyte and Sertoli cells; the production of ROS and the change in the cytoskeleton in Sertoli cells might be causes. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2013.

Ancillary