22nd World Congress on Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 9–13 September 2012, Copenhagen, Denmark: presentations and awards


Presentation of the Ian Donald Gold Medal to Jens Bang

In its desire to honor contemporary heroes, the Gold Medal committee has been guilty of overlooking some of the great figures of the past, whose innovative work provided the foundation for today's advances. Today we begin to redress this situation by awarding the Ian Donald Gold Medal to an early pioneer of prenatal diagnosis, obstetric invasive procedures and ultrasound bioeffects, Jens Bang.

Jens was born on 30th July 1936 in Copenhagen. Unlike his peripatetic contemporaries, Jens completed his education and medical training and carried out his clinical research in one city, namely, Copenhagen. In 1967, as a junior doctor, he began collaboration with a urology surgeon, Hans Henric Holm, who, with physicist Allen Northeved, had built an articulated B-mode scanning machine from various existing machines, such as the Hewlitt Packard and Physionics. This collaboration bore early fruit, providing the first description of fetal heart rate measurements in early pregnancy by means of gated M-mode tracings. Although fetal heart movements could be seen before 12 weeks, the equipment was not sufficiently sensitive to give tracings and it was not until 1974 that Hugh Robinson, using the same methodology but with more sensitive equipment, was able to develop first-trimester fetal heart rate charts. One unique feature which Holm had developed was a biopsy transducer with a hole down the center to allow him to perform accurate tissue biopsies. Holm described aspiration of ovarian cysts in 1972 and in the same year Bang and Northeved described ultrasound-assisted amniocentesis in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The paper, ‘A new ultrasonic method for transabdominal amniocentesis’, was a significant breakthrough, for before this amniocentesis had been performed blindly, following location of the placenta; the needle tip could now be followed directly, thus reducing the risk of fetal injury and bloody taps and permitting the accurate sampling of amniotic fluid from each sac in twin gestations. Jens was subsequently a co-author of many papers on amniocentesis, including the classic large randomized study in which Ann Tabor was lead author, which established the 1% procedure-related risk of miscarriage following amniocentesis that we now all accept.

In 1982, in another landmark paper, Jens Bang and colleagues described the first ultrasound-guided fetal intravenous transfusion for severe hemolytic disease. The transfusion was performed directly into the abdominal part of the umbilical vein, just beyond the cord insertion. This paper was published within a year of Berkowitz and Hobbins' paper on ultrasound-guided intraperitoneal transfusion and Rodeck's paper on intravascular transfusion by fetoscopy. Intravascular transfusion was clearly the most effective method, as it permitted precise evaluation of the hematological state of the fetus and more accurate titration of the amount of blood required to correct the anemia, and it is a tribute to the Bang method that Charles Rodeck adopted it when he became Professor and Head at Queen Charlotte's Hospital, London.

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Jens Bang and Stuart Campbell.

In the 1980s, Copenhagen became a mecca for innovative invasive procedures and there is little doubt that Susan Lenz's pioneering paper in 1981 on ultrasound-guided percutaneous transvesical oocyte collection (in essence identical to the amniocentesis technique) and Steen Smidt-Jensen and Nils Hahnemann's first description in 1984 of ultrasound-guided transabdominal chorionic villus sampling owed much to Jens's pioneering influence.

Jens and his colleagues also wrote the first paper on fetal echocardiography in 1975. Classic cardiac planes were obtained using static B-mode and, following this, M-mode was used to study movements of structures such as the atrioventricular valves and aortic and pulmonary roots. In the discussion it was postulated that the method could be used to calculate stroke volume of the fetal heart. Although fetal echocardiography received its impetus later, with the development of real-time ultrasound, Jens Bang's paper was published 5 years before the classic paper of Lindsey Allan. In so many ways, Jens Bang's research pointed the way towards future clinical developments and technology eventually caught up with his innovative ideas.

From an early stage, Jens Bang was concerned about the effects of ultrasound on the embryo. In the early 1970s he published studies on the effects of ultrasound on pregnant mice. He measured intrauterine energy levels and recommended limiting maximum power levels for ultrasound equipment. From 1978 to 1990, he was Chairman of the Committee for Ultrasound Radiation and Safety for the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) and was consultant expert on Bioeffects for EEC, AIUM and WFUMB. In these capacities, he had a major role in evaluating evidence from studies on the bioeffects of prenatal ultrasound and communicating this to the general public.

I quote from a speech by Professor Sturla Eik-Nes, former President of EFSUMB.

Professor Bang's work included the well-known safety statement agreed upon during EUROSON 1984 in Strasbourg, where the aspects introducing the routine use of ultrasound were extensively debated. The paragraph introduced then read: ‘Routine ultrasound scanning of every woman during pregnancy is not contra-indicated by the evidence currently available from biological investigations, and its performance should be left to clinical judgement.’ That particular paragraph provided the opportunity to introduce an offer of a routine scan for every woman, a procedure that has been adopted in most of the counties in the industrialised world.’

The 1980s was a troubling time for obstetric ultrasound, for there were several studies which suggested that ultrasound might not be safe for the fetus. Although none of these studies was confirmed, we were all grateful to Jens Bang for his firm leadership at a time when ultrasound was under intense scrutiny.

Ladies and gentlemen, Isaac Newton once said, ‘if I have seen a little further it is by standing on shoulders of giants’. We have all stood on Jens Bang's shoulders and we thank him for his great contributions to our specialty.

Stuart Campbell

Presentation of the Ian Donald Medal for Technical Development to Mathias Fink

The goal of ISUOG is to promote the development of ultrasound technology for diagnostic and therapeutic use in the field of gynecology and obstetrics. At the time when ISUOG was established – in 1991 – physicists had been performing acoustic experiments for more than 150 years. In 1826, the Swiss physicist, Jean-Daniel Colladon, used an underwater bell in Lake Geneva and successfully determined the speed of sound in water. In the time thereafter, physicists outlined the basic physics of sound vibrations, studying the transmission, propagation and refraction of sound. In England in 1877, Lord Rayleigh published his famous work on ‘The Theory of Sound’, describing sound by a mathematical equation. His work was the foundation for later applied acoustics.

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Mathias Fink and Sturla Eik-Nes.

The development of acoustics was advanced by the catastrophe of the Titanic in 1912, which challenged a French physicist, Paul Langevin, in collaboration with a Russian physicist, Constantin Chilowsky, to develop a powerful high-frequency ultrasonic device to detect icebergs. This device, which they called a Hydrophone, was made of thin quartz crystals glued together between steel plates. Langevin developed this instrument further and in 1916, during the First World War, the Langevin instrument was used to successfully sink a German submarine.

We now take a giant leap to present-day France, where an institute carrying Langevin's name was founded in 2009 by our guest, who we now honor with the Ian Donald Medal for Technical Development for 2012. Mathias Fink was born in Grenoble, France in 1945. He received his M.Sc. degree in mathematics from Paris University, France, in 1967, and his PhD degree in solid state physics in 1970. He then moved on to ultrasonic medical imaging and received a Doctorat es-Sciences degree in Acoustics in 1978 from Paris University. He is now a Professor of Physics at the École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la Ville de Paris (ESPCI) and at Paris Diderot University. In 1990, he founded the Laboratory Ondes et Acoustique that became the Langevin Institute in January 2009.

Mathias Fink is now the director of this Institute. In 2002, he was elected to the French Academy of Engineering, in 2003 to the French Academy of Science and in 2008 to the Collège de France as the Chair of Technological Innovation. He pioneered time-reversal mirrors and time-reversal signal processing. His current research interests are extensive and include medical ultrasonic imaging, ultrasonic therapy, non-destructive testing, underwater acoustics, telecommunications, seismology, active control of sound and vibration, analogies between optics, quantum mechanics and acoustics, wave coherence in multiple scattering media and time-reversal in physics. He has also developed the transient elastography and supersonic shear imaging that is of particular interest in the field of fetal medicine and gynecology. He holds more than 50 patents and he has published more than 300 articles.

We now all know Professor Mathias Fink as a dedicated scientist and enthusiastic speaker who catches the attention of his audience. Through his engagement, he inspires clinicians as well as technologists to understand that this technology still has great potential to continue furthering clinical diagnosis by the expected future development.

Sturla H. Eik-Nes

Free Communication Acknowledgments

The following free communications presented at the 22nd World Congress on Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology are acknowledged as the best presentations in their categories. Full abstracts to these titles can be found in Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology 2012; 40 (Suppl. 1). We thank these authors for their valuable contributions to our scientific program.

Top abstract winner

Percutaneous transhepatic ultrasound-guided cardiac catheterization in a fetal lamb model (OC01.05)

A. Edwards1,2, S. Menahem5,4, A. Veldman5, D. Schranz6, F. Wong1,3. 1The Ritchie Centre, Monash University, Ashburton, VIC, Australia; 2Perinatal Services, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Monash Newborn, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Fetal Cardiac Unit, Monash Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 5Department of Paediatrics, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 6Pediatric Heart Center, Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany

Young Investigator award winner – Obstetrics

Presence of post-systolic shortening as a sign of cardiac adaptation to chronic pressure overload in intrauterine growth restriction (OC12.02)

F. Crispi1, B. Bijnens2, E. Sepúlveda-Swatson1, M. Cruz Lemini1, J. Rojas-Benavente1, R. Garcia-Posada1, M. Sitges3, E. Gratacós1. 1Maternal-Fetal Medicine Department, ICGON, Hospital Clinic, Universitat de Barcelona; Fetal and Perinatal Medicine Research Group, IDIBAPS; and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona, Spain; 2ICREA, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 3Cardiology Department, Thorax Clinic Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain

Young Investigator award winner – Gynecology

A possible role of 3D-ultrasound in the assessment of parametrial infiltration in cervical cancer (OC24.03)

V. Chiappa1, M. Miccò3, M. Moruzzi2, M. Ludovisi2, B. Gui3, A. Valentini3, A. Testa2. 1Obstetrics and Gynaecology, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy; 2Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy; 3Radiology, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy

Best Oral Communications

The following oral communications were each selected as the best in their subject area. Selection was according to a combination of anonymous peer-review in advance of the Congress and scores for presentation and/or scientific merit allocated on-site by a panel of judges.

General gynecology

Conservative ultrasonographic follow up of asymptomatic endometrial lesions in postmenopausal women is a safe alternative to surgical procedures (OC19.01)

Y. Goldberg, N. Andria, O. Lavie, R. Mandel, A. Peleg, R. Auslender. Obstetrics and Gynecology, Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel

Early pregnancy

Ectopic pregnancies-the same but different? (OC03.06)

S. Merritt1, L. Story1, J. Mclaren1, P. Seed2, J. Hamilton1. 1Emergency Gynaecology and Early Pregnancy Unit, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom; 2Department of Women's Health, King's College London, London, United Kingdom

Uterine pathology

Ultrasound characteristics of endometrial hyperplasia described using IETA terms (OC16.01)

V. Chiappa, C. Penati, F. Dell'Orto, R. Fruscio, A. Lissoni. San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy

Reproductive medicine

Comparison of two methods to calculate mean VI and FI from ovarian stroma on the basis of spatio-temporal image correlation - high definition flow (STIC-HDF) technology (OC06.03)

M. J. Kudla2, J. Alcazar1. 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; 2Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland

How does IVF affect cyclical changes in subendometrial vascularity (OC06.04)

S. Sur, B. Campbell, N. J. Raine-Fenning. School of Clinical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom

Ovarian pathology

The risk of malignancy in unilocular ovarian cysts: a study on 1148 adnexal masses classified as unilocular cysts at transvaginal scan (OC21.01)

L. Valentin1, L. Ameye2, A. Testa3, D. Franchi4, S. Guerriero5, A. Lissoni8, D. Jurkovic6, D. Timmerman7. 1Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden; 2Department of Electrical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 3Instituto di Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; 4Obstetrics and Gynecology, European Institute of Cancer, Milano, Italy; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy; 6Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 7Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 8Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Ospedale S. Gerardo, Università di Milano, Monza, Italy

Oncology

The role of ultrasound in planning fertility sparing surgery and individual treatment in early stage cervical cancer (OC24.05)

D. Fischerova1, M. Zikan1, I. Pinkavova1, F. Frühauf1, P. Dundr2, K. Nemejcova2, A. Burgetova3, D. Cibula1. 1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Charles University, Gynecological Oncology Centre, Prague 2, Czech Republic; 2Department of Pathology, First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic; 3Department of Radiology, First Faculty of Medicine and General University Hospital, Charles University, Prague 2, Czech Republic

Pelvic pain

Can we predict pouch Douglas obliteration using a new real-time ultrasound technique: the ‘sliding sign’ (OC13.03)

S. Reid1, C. Lu2, I. Casikar1, M. Mongelli1, G. Condous1. 1Early Pregnancy, Acute Gynaecology and Advanced Endosurgery Unit, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Computer Science, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, United Kingdom

Urogynecology

Comparison of two scoring systems for diagnosing levator ani muscle damage (OC10.02)

T. Vergeldt1, M. Weemhoff2 1Rijnstate Ziekenhuis, Arnhem, Netherlands; 2Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, Netherlands

Labor

Prediction of intra-partum fetal distress using the fetal cerebro-umbilical ratio (OC14.03)

T. Prior1,2, E. Mullins1,2, P. Bennett2, S. Kumar1,2. 1Centre for Fetal Care, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; 2Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom

Preterm labor

Is there any role for first trimester cervical assessment and uterine artery Doppler as screening test for spontaneous early preterm delivery? (OC09.04)

M. Parra-Cordero1,2, A. Sepulveda-Martinez1, G. Rencoret2, E. Valdes1, H. Munoz1. 1Fetal Medicine Unit, Obstetric & Gynecology Department, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Fetal Medicine Unit, Hospital San Borja Arriaran, Santiago, Chile

Aneuploidy & fetal anomalies: first trimester

Screening for fetal spina bifida by ultrasound examination in the first trimester of pregnancy at 11–14 weeks' using fetal biparietal measurement diameter (OC05.02)

J. Bernard1,2, H. Cuckle3, J. Stirnemann1, L. J. Salomon1, Y. Ville1. 1Maternité, Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France; 2C.E.D.E.F., Le Chesnay, France; 3Columbia University Center, New York, NY, USA

Aneuploidy & fetal anomalies: second trimester

Whole-genome array CGH in fetuses with major malformations: a Danish study (OC20.06)

E. Vestergaard1, R. Christensen1, O. B. Petersen2, I. Vogel1. 1Department of Clinical Genetics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Department Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark

Fetal heart

Fetal myocardial performance (Tei) index in fetal hemoglobin Bart's disease (OC08.04)

S. Luewan, F. Tongprasert, K. Srisupundit, T. Tongsong. Obstetrics & Gynecology, Chiang Mai University, Muang, Thailand

Central nervous system

Prenatal diagnostic features of closed spinal dysraphism (OC11.06)

D. Pugash1, B. Irwin4, P. Thiessen2, D. Cochrane3, P. C. Brugger6, D. Prayer5. 1Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Neurosurgery, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 4BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 5University Clinics of Radiodiagnostics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 6Integrative Morphology Group, Centre of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

Multiple pregnancy

3D MRI volume reconstruction of the fetal brain in twin-twin transfusion syndrome: reduced brain volume in ex-donors predicts adverse outcomes (OC22.07)

M. Taylor-Clarke1,2, J. Allsop3, R. Wimalasundera1,2, M. Rutherford3, H. M. Gardiner1,2 1Institute of Reproductive & Developmental Biology, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; 2Centre for Fetal Care, Queen Charlotte's & Chelsea Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 3MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom

Fetal growth & assessing fetal health

Cardiovascular function in adulthood following IUGR with ARED flow (OC12.03)

N. Bjarnegard2, E. K. Morsing4, M. Cintio3, T. Länne2, J. Brodszki1 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; 2Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Electrical Measurements, Faculty of Engineering, Lund, Sweden; 4Department of Pediatrics, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden

Fetal therapy

In vivo validation of the treatment effect of Sildenafil in a nitrofen induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model (OC25.02)

Y. Yamamoto1, B. Thebaud4, V. Jain2, L. K. Hornberger2,3 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 3Pediatric Cardiology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 4Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Imaging technologies

An image processing technique for 3-D fractional moving blood volume (FMBV) estimation using power Doppler ultrasound (PD-US) (OC18.03)

G. N. Stevenson1, S. L. Collins2, A. W. Welsh3, L. W. Impey2, J. A. Noble1 1Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 2Oxford Fetal Medicine Unit, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom; 3School of Womens' & Childrens' Health, Royal Hospital for Women, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Best Short Oral Presentations (oral posters)

The following short oral presentations were each selected as the best in their subject area. Selection was according to a combination of anonymous peer-review in advance of the Congress and scores for presentation and/or scientific merit allocated on-site by a panel of judges.

General gynecology

Cystic ovarian structures in the peri- and postmenopause: simple ultrasound prognostic factors (OP24.01)

B. Erdodi, Z. Toth, A. Jakab

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen, Hungary

Early pregnancy

What proportion of intrauterine pregnancies result from ovum transmigration after salpingectomy for ectopic pregnancy? (OP05.01)

A. Z. Davison1, C. T. Lee2, Y. Sana1, A. Appiah1, J. A. Ross1 1Early Pregnancy and Gynaecology Assessment Unit, Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom; 2Princess Royal University Hospital, Orpington, United Kingdom

Uterine pathology

3D-transvaginal sonography by VCI analysis to differentiate endometrial polyp and hyperplasia in pre-menopausal women (OP20.01)

F. Leone1, C. Marciante1, A. Crepaldi1, M. Mariani1, E. Ferrazzi2 1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, DSC L. Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 2Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Children's Hospital Buzzi, University of Milan, Milan, Italy

Reproductive medicine

HyCoSy using gel foam to assess tubal patency (OP11.09)

D. Van Schoubroeck, T. Van den Bosch, C. Meuleman, D. Timmerman

Obstetrics & Gynecology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Ovarian pathology

Inter-observer agreement in describing adnexal masses using the International Ovarian Tumour Analysis (IOTA) terms and definitions (OP29.02)

P. Sladkevicius, L. Valentin. Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden

Pelvic pain

The prediction of pouch Douglas obliteration using off-line analysis of the TVS ‘sliding sign’: diagnosis accuracy and inter-observer agreement (OP19.06)

S. Reid1, C. Lu2, I. Casikar1, B. J. Mein3, R. Magotti3, J. Ludlow4, R. Benzie3, G. Condous1. 1Early Pregnancy, Acute Gynaecology and Advanced Endosurgery Unit, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 2Computer Science, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, United Kingdom; 3Perinatal Ultrasound, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia; 4Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Urogynecology

Hiatal ballooning is an independent risk factor of prolapse recurrence (OP13.09)

N. Rodrigo, K. Shek, V. Wong, H. P. Dietz. Department of Ob/Gyn, Sydney Medical School Nepean, Penrith, NSW, Australia

Labor

Dynamic myometrial changes in upper and lower uterine segments during the third stage of labor (OP18.08)

M. Patwardhan1,2, H. Ahn1,2, E. A. Hernandez-Andrade1,2, S. Korzeniewski1,2, Y. Hussein1,2, X. Tang1,2, T. Chaiworapongsa1,2, S. Hassan1,2, R. Romero1. 1Perinatology Research Branch, NICHD/NIH/DHHS, Detroit, MI, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA

Preterm labor

Screening of spontaneous preterm delivery by obstetric history and second trimester ultrasound in an unselected Chilean population (OP08.08)

M. Parra-Cordero1,2, G. Rencoret2, A. Sepulveda-Martinez1, H. Munoz1, D. Pedraza1. 1Fetal Medicine Unit, Obstetric & Gynecology Department, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Fetal Medicine Unit, Hospital San Borja Arriaran, Santiago, Chile

Aneuploidy & fetal anomalies: first trimester

Contingent testing, an alternative for regions lacking first trimester screening for Down's syndrome (OP23.02)

P. Conner1, A. Marsk2, H. Almström2, M. Kublickas1. 1Obstetrics & Gynecology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; 2Ultragyn, Danderyds Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

Aneuploidy & fetal anomalies: second trimester

Antenatal detection of facial clefts: is the FASP target achievable? (OP28.06)

G. Abou El Senoun3, E. S. Draper2, L. Berry2, J. Budd2, H. Mousa1. 1Fetal Medicine Unit, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Department Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Leicester, United Kingdom; 2Health Sciences, University of Leicester, East Midlands & South Yorkshire Congenital Anomaly Register, Leicester, United Kingdom; 3Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Chesterfield Hospital NHS Trust, Chesterfield, United Kingdom

Fetal heart

Abnormal first trimester tricuspid or ductus venosus flow in prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiac defects (OP12.08)

D. Nielsen1, C. K. Ekelund1, O. B. Petersen2, A. Tabor1. 1Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 2Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Aarhus, Denmark

Central nervous system

Prenatal diagnosis of Dandy-Walker malformation and Blake's pouch cyst at 15–18 weeks (OP14.08)

E. Contro1, F. De Musso1, G. Campobasso2, G. Rembouskos2, N. Rizzo1, P. Volpe2, G. Pilu1. 1Fetal Medicine Unit, Dept Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Orsola Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy; 2Fetal Medicine Unit, Di Venere and Sarcone Hospital, Bari, Italy

Multiple pregnancy

Comparison between traditional model and novel fetoscopic surgical simulator in training for laser placental dichorionization (OP15.03)

T. Wataganara1, W. Chumthup2, S. Viboonchart1. 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Medical Education Technology Center, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand

Fetal growth & surveillance

The effect of maternal vitamin D concentration on fetal bone (OP33.09)

C. Ioannou1, M. K. Javaid2, P. Mahon3, M. Yaqub4, J. A. Noble4, N. C. Harvey3, K. M. Godfrey3, C. Cooper3, A. T. Papageorghiou1,5. 1Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 2Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 3MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom; 4Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 5Oxford Maternal and Perinatal Health Institute, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom

Fetal therapy

Partial amniotic carbon dioxide insufflation (PACI) during fetoscopic surgery on 60 fetuses with spina bifida aperta (OP06.05)

T. Kohl1, R. Schürg2, H. Maxeiner2, K. Tchatcheva3, J. Degenhardt4, R. Stressig3, R. Axt-Fliedner4, U. Gembruch3. 1German Center for Fetal Surgery & Minimally-Invasive Therapy (GCSF), Giessen, Germany; 2Department of Anesthesiology & Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Giessen, Germany; 3Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany; 4Department of Prenatal Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Giessen, Germany

Technologies in obstetrics & gynecology

Comparison of ultrasound and MRI parameters in predicting survival in isolated left-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH): what works best? (OP26.02)

M. Bebbington1,2, T. Victoria1, E. Danzer1, J. Moldenhauer1, N. Khalek1, M. P. Johnson1, H. Hedrick1, N. Adzick1. 1Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Texas Fetal Center, University of Texas Houston, Houston, TX, USA

Maternal fetal Doppler

Utero-placental interface vascularity in early pregnancy estimated by 3D fractional moving blood volume (3D FMBV) predicts fetal growth restriction (OP22.01)

S. L. Collins2, G. N. Stevenson1, A. W. Welsh3, J. A. Noble1, L. W. Impey2. 1Insititute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; 2Oxford Fetal Medicine Unit, The John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom; 3School of Women's & Children's Health, Royal Hospital for Women, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Safety issues

The effect of reduced level of ultrasound power on obstetric biometric measurements (OP25.01)

R. K. Sande1,2, K. Matre3, T. Kiserud1,2, G. Eide4,5. 1Clinical Fetal Physiology Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 2Fetal Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 3Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 4Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 5Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway

Ancillary