SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Objective

  1. Top of page
  2. Objective
  3. Methods
  4. Results
  5. Conclusion

To evaluate the impact of a national first-trimester Down syndrome (DS) screening policy on the invasive testing rate and the number of newborns with DS.

Methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Objective
  3. Methods
  4. Results
  5. Conclusion

In September 2004 the National Board of Health issued guidelines recommending that all Danish pregnant women should have access to first-trimester DS screening. Fourteen of the 15 counties implemented nuchal translucency scan and double test over the next 18 months. Data on the number of deliveries, number of chorionic villus samplings and amniocenteses, and number of newborns with DS were retrieved from the National Patient Registry and the Central Danish Cytogenetic Registry for the years 2000 to 2005.

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Objective
  3. Methods
  4. Results
  5. Conclusion

The yearly number of births was stable around 65 000. The invasive testing rate decreased from 10.8% in 2000 to 6.2% in 2005. The number of newborns with DS was between 75 and 85 for the years 2000 to 2004, while the preliminary figure for 2005 is 40.

Conclusion

  1. Top of page
  2. Objective
  3. Methods
  4. Results
  5. Conclusion

It was possible to implement a national first-trimester DS screening policy over an 18-month period. The screening is effective as the number of newborns with DS was reduced by nearly 50% and the invasive testing rate by 43%.