In-utero stenting: development of a low-cost high-fidelity task trainer

Authors

  • J. F. Nitsche,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • D. T. McWeeney,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • W. D. Schwendemann,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • C. H. Rose,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • N. P. Davies,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • W. Watson,

    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
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  • B. C. Brost

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street, Rochester, MN 55905, USA
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Abstract

Objective

To develop an in-utero stent placement training model.

Methods

The in-utero stent task trainer was constructed using a formalin-preserved gravid pig uterus. Altering the size of the uterine segment, changing the fluid level in the uterus and addition of a large Ziploc freezer bag variably filled with differing amounts of ultrasound gel can vary the procedural skill required.

Results

Thoracoamniotic and vesicoamniotic shunts can be simulated using this life-like model. The cost of eight to 10 learning stations is approximately US $ 60. Fetal position, maternal size and amniotic fluid status can be altered rapidly to increase the complexity of the procedure.

Conclusions

This low-cost and realistic task trainer can provide the opportunity to practice in-utero shunt procedures in a non-clinical environment. This model should enhance learning and reinforce acquired skills. Copyright © 2009 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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