Prenatal sonographic assessment and perinatal course of ichthyosis prematurity syndrome

Authors

  • H. G. K. Blaas,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Fetal Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
    • Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Fetal Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs Hospital, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway

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  • K. Å. Salvesen,

    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Fetal Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
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  • D. Khnykin,

    1. Institute of Pathology and Centre of Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • F. L. Jahnsen,

    1. Institute of Pathology and Centre of Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • S. H. Eik-Nes

    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Center for Fetal Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Children's and Women's Health, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway
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Abstract

All cases of ichthyosis prematurity syndrome (IPS), registered at the National Center for Fetal Medicine in Trondheim, Norway between 1987 and 2010 were identified and the findings analyzed. Five fetuses with IPS were identified between 1988 and 2000. All five developed polyhydramnios between 28 and 31 weeks. The fetal stomach appeared to be empty in four cases, and was not described in one case. The fetal skin was described as ‘uneven’ at ultrasound examination in two cases. Separation of chorionic and amniotic membranes with a peculiar appearance of echo-free fluid in the chorionic cavity and echogenic sediment in the amniotic cavity were observed between 28 + 5 and 32 + 3 weeks in all cases. All fetuses were delivered prematurely between 30 and 34 weeks. All neonates had difficulties in breathing, two developed aspiration pneumonia, and one had bilateral pneumothorax after intubation and died at 6 months because of pulmonary and cardiac sequelae. Prenatal sonographic signs of IPS are separation of the membranes, echogenic amniotic fluid and echo-free chorionic fluid occurring between 28 and 32 weeks' gestation. Delivery occurs at 30–34 weeks and, as there is a high risk of asphyxia, an experienced neonatal intensive care unit team should be present at delivery. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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