Review of recent offshore wind power developments in china

Authors

  • T. Y. Liu,

    1. School of Electric, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai, China
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  • P. J. Tavner,

    Corresponding author
    • Energy Group, School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
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  • Y. Feng,

    1. Energy Group, School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
    2. School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China
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  • Y. N. Qiu

    1. Energy Group, School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom
    2. School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China
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Correspondence: P. J. Tavner, Energy Group, School of Engineering and Computing Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 4RL, UK.

E-mail: peter.tavner@durham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Rapid wind power development in China has attracted worldwide attention. The huge market potential and fast development of wind turbine manufacturing capacity are making China a world leader in wind power development. In 2010, with the newly installed wind power capacity and the cumulative installed capacity, China was ranked first in the world. In 2009, China also constructed and commissioned its first large offshore wind farm near Shanghai.

Following earlier papers reviewing the state of China's onshore wind industry, this paper presents a broader perspective and up-to-date survey of China's offshore wind power development, making comparisons between the developments in the rest of the world and China, to draw out similarities and differences and lessons for the China offshore wind industry.

The paper highlights six important aspects for China's offshore wind development: economics, location, Grid connection, technological development, environmental adaptation and national policies.

The authors make recommendations for mitigating some outstanding issues in these six aspects for the future development of China's offshore wind resource. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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