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Smart dynamic rotor control using active flaps on a small-scale wind turbine: aeroelastic modeling and comparison with wind tunnel measurements

Authors

  • T.K. Barlas,

    Corresponding author
    1. Wind Energy Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Wind Energy, DTU Wind Energy, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
    • Correspondence: T. K. Barlas, Department of Wind Energy, DTU Wind Energy, DTU Risø Campus, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark.

      E-mail: tkba@risoe.dtu.dk

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  • W. van Wingerden,

    1. Delft Center for Systems and Control, Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
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  • A.W. Hulskamp,

    1. Design and Production of Composite Structures, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft, The Netherlands
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  • G.A. M. van Kuik,

    1. Wind Energy Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands
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  • H.E. N. Bersee

    1. Design and Production of Composite Structures, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft, The Netherlands
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ABSTRACT

In this paper, the proof of concept of a smart rotor is illustrated by aeroelastic simulations on a small-scale rotor and comparison with wind tunnel experiments. The application of advanced feedback controllers using actively deformed flaps in the wind tunnel measurements is shown to alleviate dynamic loads leading to considerable fatigue load reduction. The numerical method for aeroelastically simulating such an experiment is described, together with the process of verifying the methods for accurate prediction of the load reduction potential of such concepts. The small-scale rotor is simulated using the aeroelastic tool, load predictions are compared with the wind tunnel measurements, and similar control concepts are compared and evaluated in the numerical environment. Conclusions regarding evaluation of the performance of smart rotor concepts for wind turbines are drawn from this threefold research investigation (simulation, experiment and comparison). Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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