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Keywords:

  • wind turbines;
  • aeroelasticity;
  • optimization;
  • cost modelling;
  • cost of energy

Abstract

This article reports results from a European project, where site characteristics were incorporated into the design process of wind turbines, to enable site-specific design. Two wind turbines of different concept were investigated at six different sites comprising normal flat terrain, offshore and complex terrain wind farms. Design tools based on numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations were combined with a cost model to allow optimization for minimum cost of energy. Different scenarios were optimized ranging from modifications of selected individual components to the complete design of a new wind turbine. Both annual energy yield and design-determining loads depended on site characteristics, and this represented a potential for site-specific design. The maximum variation in annual energy yield was 37% and the maximum variation in blade root fatigue loads was 62%. Optimized site-specific designs showed reductions in cost of energy by up to 15% achieved from an increase in annual energy yield and a reduction in manufacturing costs. The greatest benefits were found at sites with low mean wind speed and low turbulence. Site-specific design was not able to offset the intrinsic economic advantage of high-wind-speed sites. It was not possible to design a single wind turbine for all wind climates investigated, since the differences in the design loads were too large. Multiple-site wind turbines should be designed for generic wind conditions, which cover wind parameters encountered at flat terrain sites with a high mean wind speed. Site-specific wind turbines should be designed for low-mean-wind-speed sites and complex terrain. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.