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Figure 1. Although it was as cold as last April, for much of the country it was much drier and sunnier this year, and there was little in the way of widespread rain. For most of southern Britain the 10th was the wettest day of the month, and this radar image (

courtesy of meteox.co.uk

) for 1800 utc shows the rain area responsible, linked to a frontal wave. As it moved northeastwards, it gave around 10mm in its passage.

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Figure 2. The infra-red satellite image (

courtesy of University of Dundee

) for 1006 utc on 16 April picks out the swirl of cloud around a deep depression off northwest Scotland. This brought wet and very windy weather to western and northern Scotland, with over 50mm in the Highlands. It was, though, quite dry and warm in a rain-shadow around the Moray Firth, and over eastern England, whilst a frontal wave was crossing northern France.

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Figure 3. The 18th was perhaps the wildest day of the month. There were severe gales in northern Irish Sea regions early in the day, with further heavy rain in the northwest. Central and southern districts had sunshine and showers; a notable band of heavy showers, hail and thunder moved northeast from central southern England to the East Anglian coast, where it is depicted in this radar image (

courtesy of meteox.co.uk

) for 1500 utc.

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Figure 4. The southeast was sunny and very warm on the 25th but, as this visible image for 1020 utc (

courtesy of University of Dundee

) shows, the favoured area was small. In particular, low cloud and sea mist affected much of the south coast. Next day, as the cold front shown by the main band of cloud cleared the country, the south coast was warmer in a northwesterly airflow, whilst around London maxima were 10 degC lower than on the 25th.

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