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Figure 1. Continuing from the record-breaking April, there was a very sunny start to May across most of the British Isles. This visible image for 1236 utc on 2 May shows the excellence of the May Day Bank Holiday weather – with a few exceptions. It took a while for early-morning low cloud to break up in parts of the northeast, and the remnants of this can still be seen around Shetland. A brisk northeasterly wind kept windward coasts chilly – the maximum temperature at Cromer was only 10.7°C – and Cornwall and Devon missed out on this sunny spell. (Satellite image courtesy University of Dundee.)

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Figure 2. Although there were again some very dry spots, especially in the southeast, May was wetter than were the two preceding spring months. Heavy rain during the night of 7/8 May made this the wettest day countrywide since mid-January, as May's only really warm spell came to an end and cold frontal troughs crossed the country. Although there had been thundery outbreaks earlier on the 7th, by the time of this image, 0030 utc on 8 May, the rain was not accompanied by thunder. Very little rain fell to the east of the Greenwich Meridian. (Radar image courtesy of MeteoX.com)

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Figure 3. Northern regions were certainly not short of rain – or wind – during May. This visible image for 1249 utc on 23 May captures the spirals of cloud around an unseasonably intense depression that was at that time over northwest Scotland. Severe gales and copious rainfall accompanied it in the north, although there was a rain-shadow to the northeast of the Grampians. Southern Britain was also very windy, but had very little rain. (Satellite image courtesy University of Dundee.)

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Figure 4. The third Bank Holiday Monday (except in Scotland) in six weeks brought the least clement weather of the three. The radar coverage for 0900 utc on 30 May illustrates the passage of a cold front which, with ripples running along it, moved slowly across England and Wales. Amounts of rain were small by the time it reached the southeast late in the day. Showers followed, extending eastwards during the day just ahead of the controlling upper trough. (Radar image courtesy of MeteoX.com)

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