Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

Authors

  • Heidi M. Kieler-Ferguson,

    1. College of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
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  • Jean M. J. Fréchet,

    1. College of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA
    2. King Abdulla University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
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  • Francis C. Szoka Jr

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Bioengineering, Therapeutic Sciences and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA
    • Department of Bioengineering, Therapeutic Sciences and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA

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Abstract

For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013, 5:130–138. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1209

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Conflict of interest: Drs Kieler-Ferguson and Fréchet declare no conflicts of interest. Dr Szoka is the founder of a liposome drug delivery company that is not working on any of the compounds mentioned in this article.

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