Dendrimers as high relaxivity MR contrast agents

Authors

  • Michelle R. Longmire,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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    • Present address: Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, School of Medicine, Redwood City, CA, USA
  • Mikako Ogawa,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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    • Present address: Department of Molecular Imaging, Medical Photonics Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka, Japan
  • Peter L. Choyke,

    1. Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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  • Hisataka Kobayashi

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
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Abstract

Dendrimers are versatile macromolecules with tremendous potential as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Dendrimer-based agents provide distinct advantages over low-molecular-weight gadolinium chelates, including enhanced r1 relaxivity due to slow rotational dynamics, tunable pharmacokinetics that can be adapted for blood pool, liver, kidney, and lymphatic imaging, the ability to be a drug carrier, and flexibility for labeling due to their inherent multivalency. Clinical applications are increasingly being developed, particularly in lymphatic imaging. Herein we present a broad overview of dendrimer-based MRI contrast agents with attention to the unique chemistry and physical properties as well as emerging clinical applications.

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Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article.

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