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Water Resources Research

Cover image for Water Resources Research

November 2012

Volume 48, Issue 11

  1. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Regular Article
    4. Reviews
    5. Technical Note
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      Comment on “Pursuing the method of multiple working hypotheses for hydrological modeling” by P. Clark et al.

      Keith Beven, Paul Smith, Ida Westerberg and Jim Freer

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012282

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  2. Regular Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Regular Article
    4. Reviews
    5. Technical Note
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      A regional peaks-over-threshold model in a nonstationary climate

      M. Roth, T. A. Buishand, G. Jongbloed, A. M. G. Klein Tank and J. H. van Zanten

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012214

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      Key Points

      • A peaks-over-threshold model satisfying the index flood assumption is developed
      • Non-stationarity is taken into account using time-dependent parameters
      • Significant increase in winter precipitation extremes in the Netherlands
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      A 1-D analytical method for estimating surface water–groundwater interactions and effective thermal diffusivity using temperature time series

      A. M. McCallum, M. S. Andersen, G. C. Rau and R. I. Acworth

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012007

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      Key Points

      • Uncertainty in Darcy velocity arises due to uncertainty in thermal diffusivity
      • Method estimates Darcy velocity without specifying thermal diffusivity
      • Thermal diffusivity is also calculated which is used to check method validity
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      Interaction between injection points during hydraulic fracturing

      Kjetil M. D. Hals and Inga Berre

      Article first published online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012265

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      Key Points

      • A numerical study of hydraulic fracturing
      • A study of the stress interactions during hydrofracking
      • Predict a novel effective fracture-force
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      Projected climate change impacts on the hydrology and temperature of Pacific Northwest rivers

      Huan Wu, John S. Kimball, Marketa M. Elsner, Nate Mantua, Robert F. Adler and Jack Stanford

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012082

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      Key Points

      • Coupled in-stream and riparian thermal dynamics and source-sink routing modeling
      • Large domain distributed and continuous streamflow and temperature simulation
      • Projected large summer flow decreases and warming in PNW streams
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      Rain, rock moisture dynamics, and the rapid response of perched groundwater in weathered, fractured argillite underlying a steep hillslope

      Rohit Salve, Daniella M. Rempe and William E. Dietrich

      Article first published online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012583

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      Key Points

      • Significant seasonal rock moisture dynamic zone in shallow weathered bedrock
      • Rapid unsaturated flow mediates runoff response
      • First storm groundwater response precedes wetting front
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      Temporal moments revisited: Why there is no better way for physically based model reduction in time

      P. C. Leube, W. Nowak and G. Schneider

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011973

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      Key Points

      • Temporal moments are best for time-related model reduction of linear PDE/ODE
      • Two (four) temporal moments cover 80 % (90 %) of dynamic aquifer response
      • We encourage to use temporal moments of higher orders
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      Surface energy balance and actual evapotranspiration of the transboundary Indus Basin estimated from satellite measurements and the ETLook model

      W. G. M. Bastiaanssen, M. J. M. Cheema, W. W. Immerzeel, I. J. Miltenburg and H. Pelgrum

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR010482

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      Key Points

      • Use of passive microwave sensors instead of thermal infrared
      • Estiamtion of surface energy budget
      • Estimation of evapotranspiration and water balance
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      Analytical expressions for drainable and fillable porosity of phreatic aquifers under vertical fluxes from evapotranspiration and recharge

      Subodh Acharya, James W. Jawitz and Rao S. Mylavarapu

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012043

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      Key Points

      • Drainable and fillable porosity tend to be unequal under hydrodynamic conditions
      • Separate analytical expressions for drainable and fillable porosity are developed
      • Successive steady state ET and recharge is considered to estimate the parameters
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      Toward a statistical framework to quantify the uncertainties of hydrologic response under climate change

      Scott Steinschneider, Austin Polebitski, Casey Brown and Benjamin H. Letcher

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011318

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      Key Points

      • Framework towards quantifying multiple sources of hydrologic uncertainty
      • Hydrologic response to climate change can exceed model uncertainty bounds
      • Interaction between multiple sources of hydrologic uncertainty are nonlinear
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      Suspended sediment properties and suspended sediment flux estimates in an inundated urban environment during a major flood event

      Richard Brown and Hubert Chanson

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012381

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      Key Points

      • Suspended sediment measurements were conducted in an inundated urban environment
      • During a major flood, substantial sediment flux amplitudes were recorded
      • SSC estimates tended to increase with decreasing water depths
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      Role of surface-water and groundwater interactions on projected summertime streamflow in snow dominated regions: An integrated modeling approach

      Justin L. Huntington and Richard G. Niswonger

      Article first published online: 17 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012319

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      Key Points

      • Baseflows decrease despite higher annual precipitation and groundwater recharge
      • Groundwater discharge to streams inversely correlated to snowmelt runoff
      • Surface and groundwater interactions important for projected hydrologic change
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      Dynamic capillary effects in a small-volume unsaturated porous medium: Implications of sensor response and gas pressure gradients for understanding system dependencies

      Lili Hou, Lixia Chen and Tohren C. G. Kibbey

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012434

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      Key Points

      • Sensor response and gas pressure gradients can create significant artifacts
      • Scale and system properties impact relative magnitudes of different artifacts
      • Tau (gas/water) may be orders of magnitude smaller than thought at REV scale
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      Inferring transport characteristics in a fractured rock aquifer by combining single-hole ground-penetrating radar reflection monitoring and tracer test data

      Caroline Dorn, Niklas Linde, Tanguy Le Borgne, Olivier Bour and Maria Klepikova

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011739

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      Key Points

      • Single-hole GPR reflection data image tracer movement in individual fractures
      • Fracture connectivity and transport are characterized by repeated tracer tests
      • Ambient flow, not storage, appears to be the main cause of low mass recoveries
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      Fluid circulation and seepage in lake sediment due to propagating and trapped internal waves

      Jason Olsthoorn, Marek Stastna and Nancy Soontiens

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012552

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      Key Points

      • Internal gravity waves can induce significant seepage in a porous lake bottoms
      • Internal waves induce seepage in domains where surface waves have little effect
      • Trapped internal waves generate boundary layer instabilities, increasing seepage
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      Transient infiltration from ephemeral streams: A field experiment at the reach scale

      Jordi Batlle-Aguilar and Peter G. Cook

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012009

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      Key Points

      • Transient infiltration periods from ephemeral streams persist for several days
      • Steady-state infiltration rates significantly underestimates transmission losses
      • Important transient infiltration periods at increasing stream water level
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      An ensemble Kalman filter dual assimilation of thermal infrared and microwave satellite observations of soil moisture into the Noah land surface model

      Christopher R. Hain, Wade T. Crow, Martha C. Anderson and John R. Mecikalski

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011268

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      Key Points

      • Thermal infrared and passive microwave SM retrievals are assimilated in an LSM
      • Quantify the impact of a dual assimilation framework over single assimilation
      • Quantify the impact of using a vegetation-based estimate for observation error
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      Modeling river bed morphology, roughness, and surface sedimentology using high resolution terrestrial laser scanning

      J. Brasington, D. Vericat and I. Rychkov

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012223

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      Key Points

      • Novel geospatial method to post-process ‘huge’ laser scan datasets
      • Analysis of scale dependence in fluvial terrain models
      • Retrieval of roughness and particle size models from terrestrial laser scan data
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      Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

      R. N. Szupiany, M. L. Amsler, J. Hernandez, D. R. Parsons, J. L. Best, E. Fornari and A. Trento

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011677

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      Key Points

      • Bifurcations in large rivers
      • Interactions between hydraulics, sedimentological and morphological variables
      • Sedimentary processes
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      Spreading and convective dissolution of carbon dioxide in vertically confined, horizontal aquifers

      Christopher W. MacMinn, Jerome A. Neufeld, Marc A. Hesse and Herbert E. Huppert

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012286

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      Key Points

      • We report the first experiments of convective dissolution from gravity currents
      • We show that convective dissolution can halt the spreading of a buoyant gravity current
      • We show that the accumulation of dissolved fluid can drastically slow plume dissolution
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      Quantifying the change in soil moisture modeling uncertainty from remote sensing observations using Bayesian inference techniques

      Kenneth W. Harrison, Sujay V. Kumar, Christa D. Peters-Lidard and Joseph A. Santanello

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012337

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      Key Points

      • Soil hydraulic property (SHP) uncertainties are large
      • SHP uncertainty translates to large soil moisture modeling uncertainty
      • Remote sensing make possible large reductions in soil moisture uncertainty
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      Bayesian inference of uncertainties in precipitation-streamflow modeling in a snow affected catchment

      J. J. Koskela, B. W. F. Croke, H. Koivusalo, A. J. Jakeman and T. Kokkonen

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011773

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      Key Points

      • Formal generalized likelihood function was used with input uncertainty model
      • Both runoff and snow data were utilized in assessment of modeling uncertainties
      • The formal uncertainty analysis demonstrated the limits of the data
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      Tracing hydrologic model simulation error as a function of satellite rainfall estimation bias components and land use and land cover conditions

      Abebe S. Gebregiorgis, Yudong Tian, Christa D. Peters-Lidard and Faisal Hossain

      Article first published online: 10 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011643

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      Key Points

      • Analysis of error according to LULC helps elucidate patterns
      • Decomposition of total bias aids in understanding the tracing of errors
      • Hit bias and total bias critical for runoff and soil moisture, respectively
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      An examination of the sensitivity of the Great Salt Lake to changes in inputs

      Ibrahim Nourein Mohammed and David G. Tarboton

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011908

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      Key Points

      • Quantifies relative role of closed basin lake inputs on lake level and volume
      • Physically based approach to predict lake level sensitivity to input changes
      • Uncertainty in level predictions quantified using stochastic simulations
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      Aquifer response to surface water transience in disconnected streams

      Margaret Shanafield, Peter G. Cook, Philip Brunner, James McCallum and Craig T. Simmons

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012103

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      Key Points

      • Aquifer response in a disconnected system can be greater than flood wave
      • Unsaturated aquifer level tradeoff between infiltration and lateral dissipation
      • Stream stage and well head may be useful for determining connection status
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      A subgrid channel model for simulating river hydraulics and floodplain inundation over large and data sparse areas

      Jeffrey Neal, Guy Schumann and Paul Bates

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012514

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      Key Points

      • A new sub-grid hydraulic model was developed and evaluated
      • The model was designed for application over large data sparse regions
      • Assess the impact of small channels on the floodplain hydraulics
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      Characterization of residence time variability in a managed monomictic reservoir

      H. Ó. Andradóttir, F. J. Rueda, J. Armengol and R. Marcé

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012069

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      Key Points

      • Residence times vary greatly on daily, seasonal and interannual timescales
      • Withdrawal outlet strategy influences the seasonal evolution of residence time
      • Excessive withdrawals prior to and during dry years may reduce residence time
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      Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones

      Jay P. Zarnetske, Roy Haggerty, Steven M. Wondzell, Vrushali A. Bokil and Ricardo González-Pinzón

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011894

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      Key Points

      • Hyporheic (HZ) N is controlled by coupled transport and reaction kinetics
      • Ratio of HZ residence time to O2 reaction time controls N source-sink dynamics
      • We present a process-based scaling relationship for hyporheic N transformations
      Corrected by:

      Correction: Correction to “Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones”

      Vol. 48, Issue 12, Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012

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      Characteristics of acoustic emissions induced by fluid front displacement in porous media

      Franziska Moebius, Davide Canone and Dani Or

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012525

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      Key Points

      • Acoustic emission technique is a tool to detect interfacial fluid dynamics
      • Acoustic emissions are generated by pore scale fluid displacement phenomena
      • Number of AE events and their amplitudes are linked by power law
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      An objective methodology for merging satellite- and model-based soil moisture products

      M. T. Yilmaz, W. T. Crow, M. C. Anderson and C. Hain

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011682

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      Key Points

      • Errors are objectively estimated
      • Uncertainty estimate of soil moisture is obtained
      • Improved soil moisture product is obtained
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      Evaluation of nine large-scale hydrological models with respect to the seasonal runoff climatology in Europe

      L. Gudmundsson, T. Wagener, L. M. Tallaksen and K. Engeland

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR010911

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      Key Points

      • Large scale hydrologic models are compared to catchment scale observations
      • Model performance varies systematically with climatic conditions
      • The ensemble mean is a robust predictor of regional hydroclimatology
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      Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

      Pukhraj Deol, Josh Heitman, Aziz Amoozegar, Tusheng Ren and Robert Horton

      Article first published online: 2 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012516

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      Key Points

      • Sensible heat balance accurately characterized transient evaporation
      • Diffusive flux accounted for measured evaporation rates
      • Results suggest surface hydraulic connection loss for falling rate evaporation
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      Changes in snowpack accumulation and ablation in the intermountain west

      Adrian Harpold, Paul Brooks, Seshadri Rajagopal, Ingo Heidbuchel, Angela Jardine and Clare Stielstra

      Article first published online: 1 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011949

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      Key Points

      • First clear changes in maximum SWE and the timing of the snow season in the IMW
      • Decreases in SWE may partially be due to winter sublimation losses
      • The snowpack mass and energy balance differs across the IMW
  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Regular Article
    4. Reviews
    5. Technical Note
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      Evaluating participation in water resource management: A review

      G. Carr, G. Blöschl and D. P. Loucks

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011662

      Key Points

      • Identifies key criteria for evaluating participation
      • Provides guidance on structuring the evaluation of participation activities
      • Shows that intermediary outcomes should play a greater role
  4. Technical Note

    1. Top of page
    2. Commentaries
    3. Regular Article
    4. Reviews
    5. Technical Note
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      Transport-limitations on fluvial sediment supply to the sea

      W. B. Dade

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012179

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      Key Points

      • Sediment flux to the sea reflects wetness and steepness of a source river
      • Unexplained variability can be attributed in part to unknown grain size

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