Water Resources Research

Cover image for Water Resources Research

December 2012

Volume 48, Issue 12

  1. Technical Note

    1. Top of page
    2. Technical Note
    3. Regular Article
    4. Correction
    1. Generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) and approximate Bayesian computation: What's the connection?

      David J. Nott, Lucy Marshall and Jason Brown

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011128

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      Key Points

      • GLUE corresponds to Approximate Bayesian Computation
      • The ABC-GLUE link helps understand implicit assumptions made in GLUE
      • Advanced ABC computational methods may then be applied to GLUE
    2. An improved standardization procedure to remove systematic low frequency variability biases in GCM simulations

      Rajeshwar Mehrotra and Ashish Sharma

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012446

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      Key Points

      • An improved approach to correct for systematic biases in GCM/RCM
      • Corrects for biases across multiple time scales
      • An improved three step bias correction procedure at each time step
  2. Regular Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Technical Note
    3. Regular Article
    4. Correction
    1. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

      Kathleen M. Smits, Viet V. Ngo, Abdullah Cihan, Toshihiro Sakaki and Tissa H. Illangasekare

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012113

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      Key Points

      • All approaches have benefits and limitations
      • Approaches varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation
      • Selection of the best method to estimate evaporation is difficult
    2. Water availability and vulnerability of 225 large cities in the United States

      Julie C. Padowski and James W. Jawitz

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012335

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      Key Points

      • Traditional water availability assessments are inappropriate for urban areas
      • Including urban hydraulic sources decreases the risk of water scarcity
      • Hydraulic-based vulnerability is correlated to scarcity reports in the press
    3. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

      J. N. King

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011477

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      Key Points

      • Pose geophysical conceptual model for benthic flux and SGD
      • Apply model components to Patos Lagoon coastalzone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
      • Geochemical tracer technique estimates component of SGD that transports tracer
    4. Storage change in a flat-lying fracture during well tests

      Lawrence C. Murdoch and Leonid N. Germanovich

      Article first published online: 22 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011571

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      Key Points

      • Storage change during well tests is a non-local process
      • Field and theory show that specific storage is not an aquifer property
      • Displacement measurements can be used to characterize storage change
    5. Travel time approach to kinetically sorbing solute by diverging radial flows through heterogeneous porous formations

      Gerardo Severino, Samuele De Bartolo, Gerardo Toraldo, Gowri Srinivasan and Hari Viswanathan

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012608

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      Key Points

      • We formulate the travel time approach for transport in source-type flows
      • We provide a general procedure to compute the PDF
      • Adopting the Gaussian distribution for travel times is not in general authorized
    6. Coupling the snow thermodynamic model SNOWPACK with the microwave emission model of layered snowpacks for subarctic and arctic snow water equivalent retrievals

      A. Langlois, A. Royer, C. Derksen, B. Montpetit, F. Dupont and K. Goïta

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012133

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      Key Points

      • Improved SWE retrieval
      • Method independent from field measurements
      • Quantification of snow grain uncertainties in microwave models
    7. Identifying the optimal spatially and temporally invariant root distribution for a semiarid environment

      Gajan Sivandran and Rafael L. Bras

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012055

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      Key Points

      • Soil texture is a strong control on root distribution
      • Stochastic rainfall results in a distribution of optimal profiles
      • Vegetation is a strong control on the water balance fluxes
    8. Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 1. Hydrodynamic model

      M. Nabi, H. J. de Vriend, E. Mosselman, C. J. Sloff and Y. Shimizu

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011911

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      Key Points

      • Computational model to be used for simulation rivers bed-forms using LES
      • Modelling the flow using adaptive mesh refinement and multigrid
      • Validation of hydrodynamic model with theoretical and experimental data
    9. Household water saving: Evidence from Spain

      Rosa Aisa and Gemma Larramona

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012021

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      Key Points

      • We examine the determinants of housing water saving in Spain
      • Three synthetic indicator with variables of equipment and habits are used
      • Attitudinal, socioeconomic and demographic variables are considered
    10. A resampling method for generating synthetic hydrological time series with preservation of cross-correlative structure and higher-order properties

      C. J. Keylock

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011923

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      Key Points

      • New synthetic data algorithm presented and tested
      • It preserves the cross-correlative properties of the data series
      • It can also capture the asymmetry of hydrograph shape
    11. Evolution of ensemble data assimilation for uncertainty quantification using the particle filter-Markov chain Monte Carlo method

      Hamid Moradkhani, Caleb M. DeChant and Soroosh Sorooshian

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012144

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      Key Points

      • PF with MCMC moves enhances the reliability of streamflow prediction
      • Variable variance multipliers (VVM) reduces sample impoverishment in the PF
      • Metropolis criteria in conjunction with VVM increases parameter diversity
    12. Macroroughness and variations in reach-averaged flow resistance in steep mountain streams

      M. Nitsche, D. Rickenmann, J. W. Kirchner, J. M. Turowski and A. Badoux

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012091

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      Key Points

      • Dim-less velocity and discharge explained site variation of flow resistance
      • Dim-less velocity and discharge are empirically and dimensionally justified
      • Boulder concentration improves velocity predictions of dim-less variables
    13. Downscaling precipitation or bias-correcting streamflow? Some implications for coupled general circulation model (CGCM)-based ensemble seasonal hydrologic forecast

      Xing Yuan and Eric F. Wood

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012256

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      Key Points

      • Bias-correcting streamflow is necessary for a good ensemble forecast
      • Downscaling streamflow from CGCM is able to provide reliable seasonal forecasts
      • Well-calibrated hydrologic models remain essential to high-skill forecasts
    14. The influence of land-use composition on fecal contamination of riverine source water in southern British Columbia

      Jacques St Laurent and Asit Mazumder

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012455

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      Key Points

      • Land-use impact on fecal contamination among 42 riverine sites examined
      • Agriculture and urban land-use presented greatest threat to water quality
      • Further factors included wastewater, low dilution, and higher temperatures
    15. Reducing hydrologic model uncertainty in monthly streamflow predictions using multimodel combination

      Weihua Li and A. Sankarasubramanian

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011380

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      Key Points

      • Multimodel predictions improve streamflow estimations under large model errors
      • Multimodel combinations reduce model uncertainty
      • Evaluating models under similar predictor conditions improve predictions
    16. Transversal and longitudinal mixing in compound channels

      G. Besio, A. Stocchino, S. Angiolani and M. Brocchini

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012316

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      Key Points

      • Estimation of the mixing coefficients for compound channels
      • Lagrangian description of the river mixing processes
      • Wide range of the parameters has been investigated
    17. Effect of ship locking on sediment oxygen uptake in impounded rivers

      A. Lorke, D. F. McGinnis, A. Maeck and H. Fischer

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012483

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      Key Points

      • Ship locking is associated with strong variations of near-bed current velocity
      • Surge-induced flow variations cause variations in sediment-water oxygen flux
      • Sediment-water oxygen fluxes show pronounced diurnal rhythm
    18. Wildfire impacts on soil-water retention in the Colorado Front Range, United States

      Brian A. Ebel

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012362

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      Key Points

      • Organic matter reduction had the largest wildfire impact on soil-water retention
      • Wildfire removes organic matter-driven soil-water retention differences
      • Aspect may contribute to pre-wildfire differences in soil-water retention
    19. You have free access to this content
      The impact of wettability and connectivity on relative permeability in carbonates: A pore network modeling analysis

      Oussama Gharbi and Martin J. Blunt

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011877

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      Key Points

      • Assess the impact of wettability and connectivity on relative permeability
      • Analyze water-flood as a recovery process in carbonate reservoirs
      • Provide a benchmark samples for multiphase flow
    20. Hydrologic response to multimodel climate output using a physically based model of groundwater/surface water interactions

      M. Sulis, C. Paniconi, M. Marrocu, D. Huard and D. Chaumont

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012304

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      Key Points

      • Use of multimodel ensemble to evaluate climate change impacts on water resources
      • Uncertainty propagation using an integrated groundwater/surface water model
      • Interdependence of hydrologic variables and importance of wet/dry spell duration
    21. Characterizing the uncertainty in river stage forecasts conditional on point forecast values

      Jun Yan, Gong-Yi Liao, Mekonnen Gebremichael, Robert Shedd and David R. Vallee

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011818

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      Key Points

      • Uncertainty measure of river forecast is characterized by a conditional model
      • Model parameters are smooth functions of point forecast
      • Prediction intervals are constructed from the conditional distribution
    22. Lateral circulation in a stratified open channel on a 120° bend

      N. Williamson, S. E. Norris, S. W. Armfield and M. P. Kirkpatrick

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012218

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      Key Points

      • Stratified flow around sharp bends can produce two layer circulation behavior
      • Strong variation in shear orientation across the mixing layer promotes mixing
    23. Three-phase compositional modeling of CO2 injection by higher-order finite element methods with CPA equation of state for aqueous phase

      Joachim Moortgat, Zhidong Li and Abbas Firoozabadi

      Article first published online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011736

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      Key Points

      • Higher-order three-phase flow modeling with compositional effects
      • Introduction of rigorous non-ideality in three-phase with CO2 solubility
      • Capture of viscous and gravity fingering in three phase flow
    24. Role of snow and glacier melt in controlling river hydrology in Liddar watershed (western Himalaya) under current and future climate

      G. Jeelani, Johannes J. Feddema, Cornelis J. van der Veen and Leigh Stearns

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011590

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      Key Points

      • Simulation of long term trends in snow melt and runoff
      • Impact of climate change on water resources under current and future scenarios
      • There is a shift in the discharge peak to early spring
    25. Root niche separation can explain avoidance of seasonal drought stress and vulnerability of overstory trees to extended drought in a mature Amazonian forest

      Valeriy Y. Ivanov, Lucy R. Hutyra, Steven C. Wofsy, J. William Munger, Scott R. Saleska, Raimundo C. de Oliveira Jr. and Plínio B. de Camargo

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR011972

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      Key Points

      • Amazon rainforest is likely to exhibit “root niche separation” strategy
      • This adaptation strategy can explain the resilience during seasonal drought
      • The strategy explains sensitivity of upperstory trees to wet-season rainfall
    26. Nonparametric methods for drought severity estimation at ungauged sites

      S. Sadri and D. H. Burn

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011323

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      Key Points

      • LS-SVR, RBF NN, and MLR in drought frequency analysis
      • Comparison of three methods for drought severity estimation at ungauged sites
      • Application of a Jack Knife method
    27. Vegetated mixing layer around a finite-size patch of submerged plants: Part 2. Turbulence statistics and structures

      Alexander N. Sukhodolov and Tatiana A. Sukhodolova

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011805

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      Key Points

      • Original theoretical analysis
      • Original field scale experiments
      • Practical relevancy of the results
    28. Development of a microbial contamination susceptibility model for private domestic groundwater sources

      Paul D. Hynds, Bruce D. Misstear and Laurence W. Gill

      Article first published online: 7 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012492

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      Key Points

      • Model has high predictive accuracy and may be internationally transferable
      • Localised pathways, particularly well design parameters dominant
    29. Modeling of facade leaching in urban catchments

      S. Coutu, D. Del Giudice, L. Rossi and D. A. Barry

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012359

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      Key Points

      • We treat a new issue in urban hydrology, facade leaching of biocides
      • A simple model simulates well measured concentrations in receiving waters
      • The model is useful for risk analysis and ecotoxicological studies
    30. Application of a roughness-length representation to parameterize energy loss in 3-D numerical simulations of large rivers

      S. D. Sandbach, S. N. Lane, R. J. Hardy, M. L. Amsler, P. J. Ashworth, J. L. Best, A. P. Nicholas, O. Orfeo, D. R. Parsons, A. J. H. Reesink and R. N. Szupiany

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2011WR011284

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      Key Points

      • CFD predictions are sensitive to the applied roughness-length
      • Roughness parameter is not a particularly effective way to include energy losses
      • Model results indicate an absence of secondary circulation cells
    31. A quantitative study on accumulation of age mass around stagnation points in nested flow systems

      Xiao-Wei Jiang, Li Wan, Shemin Ge, Guo-Liang Cao, Guang-Cai Hou, Fu-Sheng Hu, Xu-Sheng Wang, Hailong Li and Si-Hai Liang

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012509

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      Key Points

      • Groundwater age distribution is closely related to groundwater flow systems
      • Age mass can accumulate around local stagnation points due to stagnancy
      • The anomalous age in the Ordos Plateau is explained by the stagnation points
    32. Analytical model of leakage through fault to overlying formations

      Mehdi Zeidouni

      Article first published online: 27 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012582

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      Key Points

      • Analytical model developed to evaluate leakage rate through a fault
      • Two-layer analytical solution extended to consider multiple overlying formations
      • Behavior and potential applications of the analytical model are examined
    33. Application of heat pulse injections for investigating shallow hyporheic flow in a lowland river

      Lisa Angermann, Stefan Krause and Joerg Lewandowski

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012564

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      Key Points

      • VHG identify pattern in groundwater-upwelling but not shallow hyporheic exchange
      • HPS indicate increased shallow hyporheic exchange above low conductive strata
      • Conjunctive use of VHG+HPS improves understanding of hyporheic exchange
    34. The influence of reservoirs, climate, land use and hydrologic conditions on loads and chemical quality of dissolved organic carbon in the Colorado River

      Matthew P. Miller

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR012312

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      Key Points

      • Climate, land use and hydrology interact to control DOC quantity and quality
      • Large reservoirs alter the quantity and quality of DOC in the Colorado River
      • River regulation overshadows watershed processes controlling DOC transport
  3. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Technical Note
    3. Regular Article
    4. Correction
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction to “Coupled transport and reaction kinetics control the nitrate source-sink function of hyporheic zones”

      Jay P. Zarnetske, Roy Haggerty, Steven M. Wondzell, Vrushali A. Bokil and Ricardo González-Pinzón

      Article first published online: 12 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1029/2012WR013291

      This article corrects:

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