Water Resources Research

Cover image for Vol. 51 Issue 6

June 2015

Volume 51, Issue 6

Pages i–vi, 3837–4860

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. Issue Information (pages i–vi)

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.21100

  2. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The emergence of hydrogeophysics for improved understanding of subsurface processes over multiple scales (pages 3837–3866)

      Andrew Binley, Susan S. Hubbard, Johan A. Huisman, André Revil, David A. Robinson, Kamini Singha and Lee D. Slater

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017016

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      Key Points:

      • A review of the emergence and development of hydrogeophysics
      • Outline of emerging techniques in hydrogeophysics
      • Presentation of future opportunities in hydrogeophysics
  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. On the assessment of reliability in probabilistic hydrometeorological event forecasting (pages 3867–3883)

      Caleb M. DeChant and Hamid Moradkhani

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016617

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      Key Points:

      • Current techniques for verifying probabilistic forecasts are approximate
      • Poisson-Binomial distribution is the precise solution to forecast verification
      • The necessary sample size for reliability assessment is reduced
    2. Identifying multiple time scale rainfall controls on Mojave Desert ecohydrology using an integrated data and modeling approach for Larrea tridentata (pages 3884–3899)

      Gene-Hua Crystal Ng, David R. Bedford and David M. Miller

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017240

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      Key Points:

      • Ecohydrological model is conditioned on in situ soil moisture and MODIS LAI data
      • Estimated efficient plant parameters and high saturated conductivity
      • Multiyear (mostly winter) rains drive multiyear shrub dynamics with year lag
    3. Analyzing the effects of excess rainfall properties on the scaling structure of peak discharges: Insights from a mesoscale river basin (pages 3900–3921)

      Tibebu B. Ayalew, Witold F. Krajewski and Ricardo Mantilla

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016258

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      Key Points:

      • Fifty-one rainfall-runoff events obtained from the Iowa River basin are analyzed
      • Scaling invariance of peak discharges frequently occurs in a mesoscale basin
      • Excess rainfall depth and duration control the scaling of peak discharges
    4. You have free access to this content
      Geomechanics of subsurface water withdrawal and injection (pages 3922–3955)

      Giuseppe Gambolati and Pietro Teatini

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016841

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      Key Points:

      • Major geomechanical effects of groundwater withdrawal and water injection
      • Numerical modeling of geomechanics as related to water withdrawal and injection
      • Advances in measuring ground displacement by satellite technology
    5. Measurement and simulation of subsurface tracer migration to tile drains in low permeability, macroporous soil (pages 3956–3981)

      Joshua M. Bishop, Michael V. Callaghan, Edwin E. Cey and Larry R. Bentley

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016310

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      Key Points:

      • Macropore-matrix mass exchange controls solute transport in low K soil
      • Antecedent moisture conditions influence flow and solute transport between years
      • Model mass exchange coefficients may vary with time or solute distribution
    6. Mechanisms driving the seasonality of catchment scale nitrate export: Evidence for riparian ecohydrologic controls (pages 3982–3997)

      Jonathan M. Duncan, Lawrence E. Band, Peter M. Groffman and Emily S. Bernhardt

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016937

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      Key Points:

      • Mass flux of nitrate peaks during summer when discharge is lowest
      • Riparian zone processes drive the seasonality of catchment scale nitrate export
      • Water table fluctuations couple ET to soil redox and N cycling and transport
    7. Delta channel networks: 1. A graph-theoretic approach for studying connectivity and steady state transport on deltaic surfaces (pages 3998–4018)

      Alejandro Tejedor, Anthony Longjas, Ilya Zaliapin and Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016577

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      Key Points:

      • Establish a quantitative framework for delta channel connectivity and dynamics
      • Compute delta's steady fluxes, contributing and nourishment areas algebraically
      • Construct vulnerability maps to identify hot spots of change
    8. Delta channel networks: 2. Metrics of topologic and dynamic complexity for delta comparison, physical inference, and vulnerability assessment (pages 4019–4045)

      Alejandro Tejedor, Anthony Longjas, Ilya Zaliapin and Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016604

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      Key Points:

      • Define metrics that depict the topologic and dynamic complexity of deltas
      • Study how complexity relates to an intuitive notion of vulnerability
      • Project deltas for comparison and physical insight in a topo-dynamic space
    9. Isotope-based Fluvial Organic Carbon (ISOFLOC) Model: Model formulation, sensitivity, and evaluation (pages 4046–4064)

      William I. Ford and James F. Fox

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016999

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      Key Points:

      • A new isotope-based fluvial organic carbon budget model is formulated
      • Sensitivity analysis suggests high uncertainty reduction of the carbon budget
      • The isotope subroutine parameterizes the critical shear stress of algae
    10. Exploring scale-dependent ecohydrological responses in a large endorheic river basin through integrated surface water-groundwater modeling (pages 4065–4085)

      Yong Tian, Yi Zheng, Chunmiao Zheng, Honglang Xiao, Wenjie Fan, Songbing Zou, Bin Wu, Yingying Yao, Aijing Zhang and Jie Liu

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016881

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      Key Points:

      • Crosschecking hydrological modeling results with remote sensing-derived data sets
      • Scale-dependence of ET and LAI characterized via integrated modeling
      • Integrated modeling results shed light on solving transboundary water conflicts
    11. Probabilistic human health risk assessment of degradation-related chemical mixtures in heterogeneous aquifers: Risk statistics, hot spots, and preferential channels (pages 4086–4108)

      Christopher V. Henri, Daniel Fernàndez-Garcia and Felipe P. J. de Barros

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016717

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      Key Points:

      • The risk posed by chemical mixtures reaches a maximum at a critical distance
      • Preferential channels can have beneficial or detrimental consequences on risk
      • High-risk areas are the most reliable with Gaussian-like risk-pdfs
    12. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Model-based analysis of the influence of catchment properties on hydrologic partitioning across five mountain headwater subcatchments (pages 4109–4136)

      Christa Kelleher, Thorsten Wagener and Brian McGlynn

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016147

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      Key Points:

      • Sensitivity analysis of an uncalibrated model constrained by expert knowledge
      • Sensitive parameters are similar across subcatchments but vary seasonally
      • A subset of snow, soil, and vegetation parameters control partitioning
    13. Validation of hydraulic tomography in an unconfined aquifer: A controlled sandbox study (pages 4137–4155)

      Zhanfeng Zhao, Walter A. Illman, Tian-Chyi J. Yeh, Steven J. Berg and Deqiang Mao

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016910

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      Key Points:

      • Hydraulic tomography can characterize the unconfined aquifer quite well
      • Estimated tomograms accurately predict the drawdown responses
      • Considering unconfined aquifer heterogeneity yields improved prediction
    14. Reactive transport modeling of geochemical controls on secondary water quality impacts at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN (pages 4156–4183)

      Gene-Hua Crystal Ng, Barbara A. Bekins, Isabelle M. Cozzarelli, Mary Jo Baedecker, Philip C. Bennett, Richard T. Amos and William N. Herkelrath

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016964

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      Key Points:

      • Reactive transport model of secondary water quality impacts from crude oil spill
      • Distinct oil constituent properties drive secondary plume production
      • Direct CH4 and CO2 outgassing and Fe sorption decrease secondary plumes
    15. A general analytical solution for steady flow in heterogeneous porous media (pages 4184–4197)

      J. R. Craig

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016449

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      Key Points:

      • General analytical solution for steady flow through heterogeneous porous media
      • Heterogeneity represented by arbitrary 2-D polynomial
      • The solution is exact to machine precision
    16. What time scales are important for monitoring tidally influenced submarine groundwater discharge? Insights from a salt marsh (pages 4198–4207)

      Alicia M. Wilson, Tyler B. Evans, Willard S. Moore, Charles A. Schutte and Samantha B. Joye

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015984

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      Key Points:

      • Tidally driven SGD varied by an order of magnitude over a 1 year period
      • Variations in SGD reflected spring-neap cycles and seasonal changes in sea level
      • Short-term monitoring cannot fully capture groundwater flow in coastal systems
    17. Temporal dynamics of catchment transit times from stable isotope data (pages 4208–4223)

      Julian Klaus, Kwok P. Chun, Kevin J. McGuire and Jeffrey J. McDonnell

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016247

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      Key Points:

      • Approach for time variant catchment transit time
      • Modeling irregular shape of transit time distributions by time variant mixing
      • Modeling catchment transit time in WS10 of HJA Forest
    18. Probabilistic inference of multi-Gaussian fields from indirect hydrological data using circulant embedding and dimensionality reduction (pages 4224–4243)

      Eric Laloy, Niklas Linde, Diederik Jacques and Jasper A. Vrugt

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016395

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      Key Points:

      • Joint Bayesian inference of Gaussian conductivity fields and their variograms
      • A dimensionality reduction that systematically honors the underlying variogram
      • Distributed multiprocessor implementation is straightforward
    19. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Detection and attribution of urbanization effect on flood extremes using nonstationary flood-frequency models (pages 4244–4262)

      I. Prosdocimi, T. R. Kjeldsen and J. D. Miller

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017065

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      Key Points:

      • Urbanization is found to have an impact on high flows in a urbanized catchment
      • The use of point processes is advocated for trend detection and attribution
      • The use of process-related covariates gives a better representation of change
    20. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A harmonic pulse testing method for leakage detection in deep subsurface storage formations (pages 4263–4281)

      Alexander Y. Sun, Jiemin Lu and Susan Hovorka

      Article first published online: 16 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016567

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      Key Points:

      • Harmonic pulsing testing (HPT) is proposed for leakage detection
      • Analytical and numerical models are developed to prove the concept
      • HPT is a cost-effective tool for monitoring deep subsurface repositories
    21. A new general 1-D vadose zone flow solution method (pages 4282–4300)

      Fred L. Ogden, Wencong Lai, Robert C. Steinke, Jianting Zhu, Cary A. Talbot and John L. Wilson

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017126

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      Key Points:

      • We have found a new solution of the general unsaturated zone flow problem
      • The new solution is a set of ordinary differential equations
      • Numerically simple method is guaranteed to converge and to conserve mass
    22. Effects of salinity variations on pore water flow in salt marshes (pages 4301–4319)

      Chengji Shen, Guangqiu Jin, Pei Xin, Jun Kong and Ling Li

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016911

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      Key Points:

      • Upward density gradients lead to unstable pore water flow in salt marshes
      • Unstable pore water flow enhances local solute mixing in the marsh soil
      • Downward density gradients affect less pore water flow in salt marshes
    23. Landscape reorganization under changing climatic forcing: Results from an experimental landscape (pages 4320–4337)

      Arvind Singh, Liam Reinhardt and Efi Foufoula-Georgiou

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017161

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      Key Points:

      • Climate shifts reorganize landscapes at all scales
      • Fluvial regime expands to smaller scales under increased precipitation
      • Landscape reorganization mainly driven by hillslope erosion
    24. A spatiotemporal precipitation generator based on a censored latent Gaussian field (pages 4338–4358)

      Anastassia Baxevani and Jan Lennartsson

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016455

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      Key Points:

      • Latent censored Gaussian spatiotemporal field
      • Marginals given by gamma and generalized Pareto distribution
      • New estimation methodology for covariance of censored bivariate Gaussian
    25. Microbubble transport in water-saturated porous media (pages 4359–4373)

      Y. Ma, X.-Z. Kong, A. Scheuermann, S. A. Galindo-Torres, D. Bringemeier and L. Li

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016019

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      Key Points:

      • Visualization of bubble migration was enabled by using transparent gelbeads
      • Characteristic width of bubble plume following a power law with an exponent of 0.2
      • Circulation of pore water velocity following a power law with an exponent of 0.6
    26. You have free access to this content
      Flow resistance in natural, turbulent channel flows: The need for a fluvial fluid mechanics (pages 4374–4390)

      Christopher J. Keylock

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016989

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      Key Points:

      • Conventional hydraulics is inadequate for describing complex fluvial processes
      • Fractal descriptions of a forcing may be linked to turbulent dissipation
      • Nonequilibrium turbulence modeling can incorporate greater process complexity
    27. Piece-wise mixed integer programming for optimal sizing of surge control devices in water distribution systems (pages 4391–4408)

      Olya Skulovich, Russell Bent, David Judi, Lina Sela Perelman and Avi Ostfeld

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016256

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      Key Points:

      • Optimal closed surge tanks design is formulated using mathematical programming
      • Discretization of the solution space is followed by approximation and MILP
      • The algorithm is much more effective than crude simulation-based optimization
    28. You have free access to this content
      Hydrology: The interdisciplinary science of water (pages 4409–4430)

      Richard M. Vogel, Upmanu Lall, Ximing Cai, Balaji Rajagopalan, Peter K. Weiskel, Richard P. Hooper and Nicholas C. Matalas

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017049

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      Key Points:

      • Human activity is inherently a part of the natural hydrologic system
      • Water, climate, energy, food, society, and environment are intertwined
      • Models must account for bidirectional coupling of human/hydrologic systems
    29. Flood response for the watersheds of the Fernow Experimental Forest in the central Appalachians (pages 4431–4453)

      Naomi S. Bates, James A. Smith and Gabriele Villarini

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015871

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      Key Points:

      • Despite change in Fernow there is weak evidence of nonstationarities in flood
      • Fernow peaks have thin tails relative to basins producing record floods in CA
      • Perched water tables may play a role in extreme flood hydrology in the CA
    30. On the optimal design of experiments for conceptual and predictive discrimination of hydrologic system models (pages 4454–4481)

      C. P. Kikuchi, T. P. A. Ferré and J. A. Vrugt

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016795

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      Key Points:

      • We present a metric to quantify conceptual and predictive discrimination
      • The expected discrimination of prospective data points are calculated
      • Optimal data points depend on between-model variance and information redundancy
    31. Optimal residential water conservation strategies considering related energy in California (pages 4482–4498)

      Alvar Escriva-Bou, Jay R. Lund and Manuel Pulido-Velazquez

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016821

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      Key Points:

      • Increased savings of water, energy and GHG when energy costs are included
      • We obtained water and energy own and cross-price elasticities
      • Our results encourage water and energy utilities to work together
    32. Nonstationarity in seasonality of extreme precipitation: A nonparametric circular statistical approach and its application (pages 4499–4515)

      Nirajan Dhakal, Shaleen Jain, Alexander Gray, Michael Dandy and Esperanza Stancioff

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016399

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      Key Points:

      • Distribution of extreme precipitation dates often exhibits multiple modes
      • Nonparametric circular statistical approach characterizes changes in seasonality
      • New method allows for an adaptive estimation of seasonal probability density
    33. Linear functional minimization for inverse modeling (pages 4516–4531)

      D. A. Barajas-Solano, B. E. Wohlberg, V. V. Vesselinov and D. M. Tartakovsky

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016179

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      Key Points:

      • New inverse modeling technique for systems with piecewise continuous parameters
      • New linearized functional minimization method for nonlinear parameter estimation
      • Method proposed resolves large-scale features of parameters from sparse data
    34. River infiltration to a subtropical alluvial aquifer inferred using multiple environmental tracers (pages 4532–4549)

      S. Lamontagne, A. R. Taylor, J. Batlle-Aguilar, A. Suckow, P. G. Cook, S. D. Smith, U. Morgenstern and M. K. Stewart

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR015663

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      Key Points:

      • Age tracers can estimate infiltration rates in subtropical aquifers
      • Tracers in riparian groundwater have a high dispersion
      • Leakage from the underlying Great Artesian Basin may be significant
    35. The spatial and temporal evolution of contributing areas (pages 4550–4573)

      Fabian Nippgen, Brian L. McGlynn and Ryan E. Emanuel

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016719

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      Key Points:

      • Storage patterns determined by lateral water redistribution and ET
      • Streamflow driven by storage threshold-mediated connectivity
      • Contributing areas show hysteretic behavior with streamflow
    36. Improving the accuracy of risk prediction from particle-based breakthrough curves reconstructed with kernel density estimators (pages 4574–4591)

      Erica R. Siirila-Woodburn, Daniel Fernàndez-Garcia and Xavier Sanchez-Vila

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016394

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      Key Points:

      • We develop a new methodology to reconstruct breakthrough curves from tracked particles
      • Error is evaluated as a function of the number of particles used
      • The new method outperforms traditional reconstructions for risk metrics
    37. Numerical investigation of methane and formation fluid leakage along the casing of a decommissioned shale gas well (pages 4592–4622)

      A. Nowamooz, J.-M. Lemieux, J. Molson and R. Therrien

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016146

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      Key Points:

      • Methane and brine leakage rates along the cemented casing of a shale gas well
      • Numerical simulations
    38. New scaling model for variables and increments with heavy-tailed distributions (pages 4623–4634)

      Monica Riva, Shlomo P. Neuman and Alberto Guadagnini

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016998

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      Key Points:

      • A new statistical scaling model is developed, explored and applied
      • Apparent inconsistency between variable and increment statistics is eliminated
      • Parameters are estimated using variable and increment moments jointly
    39. You have free access to this content
      Water conservation and hydrological transitions in cities in the United States (pages 4635–4649)

      George M. Hornberger, David J. Hess and Jonathan Gilligan

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016943

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      Key Points:

      • Both socioeconomic and hydroclimatological factors affect water conservation
      • High-income and low precipitation states tend to strong conservation policies
      • High-income and low water availability cities tend somewhat to strong policies
    40. On kinematics and flow velocity prediction in step-pool channels (pages 4650–4667)

      V. D'Agostino and T. Michelini

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016631

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      Key Points:

      • The flow velocities in three step-pool reaches were measured to assess the average reach velocity
      • An empirical relationship to predict the energy loss from the step crest to pool end was calibrated
      • A formula, based on relative submergence and slope, was found to calculate Manning's n coefficient
    41. Colloid particle size-dependent dispersivity (pages 4668–4683)

      Constantinos V. Chrysikopoulos and Vasileios E. Katzourakis

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016094

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      Key Points:

      • Colloid dispersivity is positively correlated with colloid particle size
      • Colloid dispersivity is a function of interstitial velocity
      • Tracer-based dispersion coefficients should not be used to analyze colloid data
    42. Self-healing of cement fractures under dynamic flow of CO2-rich brine (pages 4684–4701)

      Peilin Cao, Zuleima T. Karpyn and Li Li

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016162

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      Key Points:

      • Residence time and initial fracture aperture control the tendency to self-heal
      • There is a narrow threshold between fracture opening and closure condition
      • Long residence time and small apertures promote fracture closure
    43. An analytical framework for flood water conservation considering forecast uncertainty and acceptable risk (pages 4702–4726)

      Wei Ding, Chi Zhang, Yong Peng, Ruijie Zeng, Huicheng Zhou and Ximing Cai

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017127

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      Key Points:

      • Analytical framework for flood water conservation
      • Forecast uncertainty and acceptable risk affect the scope
      • Two-dimensional hedging rules are derived for water conservation and flood control
    44. Attribution of streamflow trends in snow and glacier melt-dominated catchments of the Tarim River, Central Asia (pages 4727–4750)

      Doris Duethmann, Tobias Bolch, Daniel Farinotti, David Kriegel, Sergiy Vorogushyn, Bruno Merz, Tino Pieczonka, Tong Jiang, Buda Su and Andreas Güntner

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016716

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      Key Points:

      • Hydrological model explicitly considers the effect of glacier geometry changes on streamflow trend
      • Multiobjective calibration using discharge and glacier mass balance criteria
      • Increase of temperature and glacier melt played a larger role than previously suggested
    45. A forward analysis on the applicability of tracer breakthrough profiles in revealing the pore structure of tight gas sandstone and carbonate rocks (pages 4751–4767)

      Ayaz Mehmani, Yashar Mehmani, Maša Prodanović and Matthew Balhoff

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016948

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      Key Points:

      • TBPs as a cheap method of inferring the pore structure are studied
      • A new algorithm for including vugs and microcracks in PNMs is introduced
      • TBPs show generally moderate sensitivity to the diageneses considered
  4. Debates

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Capturing feedbacks between physical and social processes (pages 4770–4781)

      Giuliano Di Baldassarre, Alberto Viglione, Gemma Carr, Linda Kuil, Kun Yan, Luigia Brandimarte and Günter Blöschl

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016416

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      Key Points:

      • A novel approach to explore flood risk changes is developed
      • The approach explains the dynamics emerging from human-flood interactions
      • Green societies tend to be less affected by increasing flood frequency
    3. You have free access to this content
      Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Modeling flood risk as a public policy problem (pages 4782–4788)

      Patricia Gober and Howard S. Wheater

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016945

      Key Points:

      • Socio-hydrology is a tool for adaptation, planning, and floodplain management
      • Socio-hydrology encompasses a knowledge translation component
      • Resilience is the capacity to convert public perceptions into collective action
    4. You have free access to this content
    5. You have free access to this content
    6. You have free access to this content
      Debates—Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Socio-hydrologic modeling: Tradeoffs, hypothesis testing, and validation (pages 4806–4814)

      Tara J. Troy, Mitchell Pavao-Zuckerman and Tom P. Evans

      Article first published online: 9 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017046

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      Key Points:

      • Socio-hydrologic models can be seen as hypotheses of coupled system dynamics
      • Robust validation is required across multiple basins
      • Trade-offs between generality, precision, and realism are required
  5. Commentaries

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. Digital catchment observatories: A platform for engagement and knowledge exchange between catchment scientists, policy makers, and local communities (pages 4815–4822)

      E. B. Mackay, M. E. Wilkinson, C. J. A. Macleod, K. Beven, B. J. Percy, M. G. Macklin, P. F. Quinn, M. Stutter and P. M. Haygarth

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016824

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      Key Points:

      • Digital observatories in catchment science can aid stakeholder involvement
      • Digital catchment observatories enable new engagement between user groups
      • Stakeholders can participate in science and cocreate tools for communication
    2. You have free access to this content
      Water management: Current and future challenges and research directions (pages 4823–4839)

      William J. Cosgrove and Daniel P. Loucks

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2014WR016869

    3. Storage selection functions: A coherent framework for quantifying how catchments store and release water and solutes (pages 4840–4847)

      Andrea Rinaldo, Paolo Benettin, Ciaran J. Harman, Markus Hrachowitz, Kevin J. McGuire, Ype van der Velde, Enrico Bertuzzo and Gianluca Botter

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR017273

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      Key Points:

      • Storage selection functions recapitulate age dynamics
      • Formulation of transport by travel time distributions
      • Flow and transport at catchment scales
  6. Technical Reports: Methods

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
    1. Estimating stream filtration from a meandering stream under the Robin condition (pages 4848–4857)

      Ching-Sheng Huang and Hund-Der Yeh

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/2015WR016975

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      Key Points:

      1. An analytical solution describing filtration from a meandering stream is developed
      2. The solution is applicable to irregular stream channels
      3. Treating meandering streams as a straight one causes inexact filtration estimation
  7. Comment

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply
  8. Reply

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Review Article
    4. Research Articles
    5. Debates
    6. Commentaries
    7. Technical Reports: Methods
    8. Comment
    9. Reply

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