Human NKCC2 cation–Cl co-transporter complements lack of Vhc1 transporter in yeast vacuolar membranes

Authors

  • Silvia Petrezselyova,

    1. Department of Membrane Transport, Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic
    Current affiliation:
    1. Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular and Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
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  • Angel Dominguez,

    1. Department of Microbiology and Genetics, IBSAL, CIETUS, University of Salamanca, Spain
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  • Pavla Herynkova,

    1. Department of Membrane Transport, Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic
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  • Juan F. Macias,

    1. Department of Medicine, University of Salamanca, Spain
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  • Hana Sychrova

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Membrane Transport, Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic
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Correspondence to: H. Sychrova, Department of Membrane Transport, Institute of Physiology AS CR, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague 4, Czech Republic.

E-mail: sychrova@biomed.cas.cz

Abstract

Cation–chloride co-transporters serve to transport Cl and alkali metal cations. Whereas a large family of these exists in higher eukaryotes, yeasts only possess one cation–chloride co-transporter, Vhc1, localized to the vacuolar membrane. In this study, the human cation–chloride co-transporter NKCC2 complemented the phenotype of VHC1 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its activity controlled the growth of salt-sensitive yeast cells in the presence of high KCl, NaCl and LiCl. A S. cerevisiae mutant lacking plasma-membrane alkali–metal cation exporters Nha1 and Ena1-5 and the vacuolar cation–chloride co-transporter Vhc1 is highly sensitive to increased concentrations of alkali–metal cations, and it proved to be a suitable model for characterizing the substrate specificity and transport activity of human wild-type and mutated cation–chloride co-transporters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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