Sequence of the open reading frame of the FL01 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Authors

  • A. W. R. H. Teunissen,

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    1. Department of Microbiology and Enzymology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
    • Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • E. Holub,

    1. Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • J. Van Der Hucht,

    1. Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • J. A. Van Den Berg,

    1. Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
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  • H. Y. Steensma

    1. Department of Microbiology and Enzymology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands
    2. Department of Cellbiology and Genetics, Leiden University, Wassenaarseweg 64, 2333 AL Leiden, The Netherlands
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Abstract

The cloned part of the flocculation gene FLO1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Teunissen, A.W.R.H., van den Berg, J.A. and Steensma, H.Y. (1993). Physical localization of the flocculation gene FLO1 on chromosome I of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Yeast, in press) has been sequenced. The sequence contains a large open reading frame of 2685 bp. The amino acid sequence of the putative protein reveals a serine- and threonine-rich C-terminus (46%), the presence of repeated sequences and a possible secretion signal at the N-terminus. Although the sequence is not complete (we assume the missing fragment consists of repeat units), these data strongly suggest that the protein is located in the cell wall, and thus may be directly involved in the flocculation process.

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