IMPLICATIONS FOR PRIMARY CARE PROVIDERS OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH HAZARDS ON PREGNANT WOMEN AND THEIR INFANTS

Authors

  • Judith Greenberg

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    • Judith Greenberg received her B.A. in English and her B.S. in Nursing from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. In 1973 she visited the People's Republic of China, and co-authored a book about science in China, her area of specialty being the Chinese Health Care system. From 1974-78, Ms. Greenberg worked as a staff nurse in Labor and Delivery and the Outpatient Department at Alta Bates Hospital in Berkeley, California. She has recently completed the Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program at the University of California, San Diego, with a specialty in Nurse-Midwifery


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ABSTRACT

With more and more women of childbearing age in the work force, primary care providers must pay attention to the hazards of the workplace, and potential deleterious effects on reproduction. Informed sources point to environmental and workplace exposures as possible causes of birth defects, low birth weight babies, prematurity, mental retardation, and behavioral problems. The intention of this paper is to acquaint the provider with known and suspected hazards for pregnant women and the fetus, as well as discussing exposures to men that may affect their ability to reproduce normally. The relevant literature is reviewed and guidelines for taking an occupational history and making work-related recommendations outlined.

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