SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

ABSTRACT

The alternate birthing movement has burgeoned since the Maternity Center Association, in 1975, initiated the first demonstration project for family-centered care in a homelike out-of-hospital setting. Concomitant to this growth, consumers and future providers of health care, especially nurse-midwifery students, have demanded that maternity care educators include orientation to alternative birth center management in their curricula. The author discusses her participation in the Maternity Center Association's “faculty fellowship,” an innovation devised to meet these needs of students as well as her own needs for continuing professional growth.