AN INDOCHINESE REFUGEE POPULATION IN A NURSE-MIDWIFE SERVICE

Authors

  • Claire Christopherson Nelson C.N.M., M.S.,

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    • Claire Christopherson Nelson received her B.S.N. from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, and her M.S. in Maternal-Child Nursing and Nurse-Midwifery from the University of Minnesota. She has been employed as staff nurse midwife at Hennepin County Medical Center since 1975 and since March of 1981 has been Codirector of the Nurse-Midwife Service.

  • Margaret A. Hewitt C.N.M., M.S.

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    • Margaret A. Hewitt received her R.N. from Bismarck Hospital, her BSN from the Uniuersity of North Dakota and her M.S. in Maternity Nursing and Nurse-Midwifery from Columbia University, New York. She established the Nurse-Midwife Service at Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1973 and was director of the program until 1981. She now lives in Ceres, California.


Nurse Midwife Service, Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, Hennepin County Medical Center, 701 Park Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55415

ABSTRACT

The Nurse-Midwife Service of a county teaching hospital provided care for 229 Indochinese refugee women in 1980 and 1981. Unique health and obstetric problems presented themselves and language and cultural barriers were overcome while providing care. In spite of years of hardship and deprivation, the obstetric and newborn outcomes for this group of women were good. The key to success in working well with this group of women is to adjust their care to meet their cultural expectations of childbirth as much as is safely possible and to allow their cultural advantage of relaxed childbirth to work for them.

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