A Comparison of Prepared and Unprepared First-Time Fathers' Needs During the Childbirth Experience

Authors

  • Stephanie M. MacLaughlin R.N., M.S.N.,

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    • Stephanie M. MacLaughlin is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee. She received her BSN from the University of Wisconsin —0shkosh and her MSN from the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee. Professional experience includes positions held as staff nurse in labor and delivery, postpartum, newborn nursery, and in a prenatal clinic.

  • Ann M. Taubenheim R.N., M.S.

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    • Ann M. Taubenheim is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Ambulatory Services at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She also holds joint appointment as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee. She received her B.S.N. from the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee and her M.S. in maternal—child nursing from the Medical College of Virginia. Professional experience includes positions held as an assistant professor of nursing and as staff nurse in labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn nursery. She is presently the coleader of a support group for expectant fathers.


University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Nursing, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201.

ABSTRACT

Eleven first-time fathers who had not attended prenatal classes were interviewed before and after attending their wives' childbirth to determine the father's special needs at this time. The same fifty item questionnaire was utilized in both the predelivery and post-delivery interviews. The results of the survey were compared to a previous study conducted by one of the investigators on first-time fathers who had attended prenatal classes. The comparison revealed that fathers' expectations and needs are very similar whether they attend prenatal classes or not.

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