The Cervical Cap: Effectiveness as a Contraceptive

Authors

  • Deborah Boehm R.N., M.P.H.

    Corresponding author
      Childbearing Childrearing Center, University of Minnesota, 2512 Delaware Street, SE. Minneapolis, MN 55414.
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    • Deborah Boehm has a B.S.N. degree from Thomas Jefferson University, Pennsylvania, and an M.P.H. from the University of Minnesota. She has worked as a staff nurse, a public health nurse, and for the past four years, as a nurse practitioner in women's health care for the Childbearing Childrearing Center and the Breast Diagnostic Center at the University of Minnesota.


  • The cap continues to be available for purchase through Lamberts, Ltd., 200 Queensbridge Road, Calston, London, England E8 3LZ. In order to obtain it currently, the request- or needs to obtain a Food & Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption Number.

Childbearing Childrearing Center, University of Minnesota, 2512 Delaware Street, SE. Minneapolis, MN 55414.

ABSTRACT

The cervical cap is an ancient method of contraception revitalized during the 1970s by feminist health care practitioners. It acts as a contraceptive both mechanically and chemically. This study looks at the effectiveness and satisfaction of the cervical cap in 76 women fitted over a 1-year period. The cap is 80.4% effective according to the Pearl Index and 89% of the women are satisfied with using the cap. There is a 51% continuation rate over a 1-year period. The cervical cap appears to have a satisfactory rate of contraception when compared with other barrier methods and women are adept at its use. A significant finding is that most pregnancies occur in the first three months of cap use. A much higher effectiveness is seen subsequently.

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