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A HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF MIDWIFERY IN THE BLACK COMMUNITY: 1600–1940

Authors

  • Sharon A. Robinson CNM, MS

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    • Sharon Robinson received her BSN from Howard University and nursemidwifery education and her MS degree from Columbia University. She has worked as a women's health care specialist, has taught midwifery, and has been involved in the promotion of midwifery through her participation in radio and television talk shows, workshops, and career days. She is currently on the faculty of the Howard University College of Nursing. [Text missing in PDF] In addition to her work in women's health, Sharon is a member of the Board of Directors of the Jackie Robinson Foundation and has been involved in program development, advisement and counseling of high school and college students, organization and coordination of scholarship committees, and participation in fund raising.


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ABSTRACT

Over the past 25 years there has been a rebirth of the profession and practice of midwifery in the United States. Emerging out of the rebirth have come numerous accounts of the history of midwifery. In this article, the author reviews the development of midwifery in black communities of the rural southeastern states from the 1600s through the 1940s. Several questions emerge as areas for further study.

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