THE PREPARATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN FOR THE BIRTH OF A SIBLING

Authors

  • Stephanie M. MacLaughlin RN, MSN,

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    • Stephanie M. MacLaughlin is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She received her BSN from the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and her MSN from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is currently a doctoral student in Educational Psychology at Marquette University. Professional experience includes positions held as staff nurse in labor and delivery, postpartum, newborn nursery, and in a prenatal clinic. Ms. MacLaughlin and the coauthor hold prenatal classes for siblings at the Nursing Center, a nurse-managed center at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Nursing.

  • Kathleen B. Johnston RN, MS

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    • Kathleen B. Johnston is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She received her BSN from Texas Christian University and her MS in Child Development and Family Relations from University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Her professional experience includes 11 years of teaching parent-child nursing and child development courses, plus work as a staff nurse in labor and delivery, postpartum, and nurseries. In addition to the sibling preparation classes, Ms. Johnston teaches childbirth preparation and postpartum classes for mothers and couples.


University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Nursing, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201.

ABSTRACT

A review of the literature reveals that new siblinghood is a crisis that has been studied very little. Positive effects have been acknowledged regarding the preparation of an older child for the birth of a sibling. These suggest that those who work with young families can utilize opportunities to intervene in this situational and maturational crisis to promote healthy adaptation. The program carried out by School of Nursing faculty and students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee prepares preschool children for the arrival of a new baby and gives families information and skills to promote a positive resolution of the crisis.

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