THE ARRIVAL OF A RIVAL: MATERNAL PERCEPTIONS OF TODDLERS‘ REGRESSIVE BEHAVIORS AFTER THE BIRTH OF A SIBLING

Authors

  • Ms. Robin Kayiatos CNM, MSN,

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    • Robin Kayiatos is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing and Health. She received her BSN, MSN, and nurse-midwifery education from the University of Kentucky. Professional experience includes positions held as a staff nurse and as a nurse-midwife in prenatal clinics, labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn nursery

  • Janiece Adams RN, MSN,

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    • Janiece Adams is a clinical nurse specialist presently working in a postpartum-newborn nursery unit. She received her BSN from Northwestern State University, Louisiana and her MSN from the University of Arkansas. Professional experience includes positions held as a perinatal clinical nurse specialist, an Instructor of Nursing, and a staff nurse in labor and delivery, postpartum, and newborn nursery

  • Barbara Gilman RN, MSN

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    • Barbara Gilman is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing and Health. She received her BSN and MSN from the University of Cincinnati. Professional experience includes positions held as a head nurse and staff nurse in labor and delivery and as a staff nurse in postpartum and newborn nursery


University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing and Health, Mail Location 38, Cincinnati, OH 45221.

ABSTRACT

Twenty-nine mothers were interviewed about their perceptions of sibling rivalry after the arrival of their second child. Regressive behavior in the toddler was reported by 93% of the mothers, the mean number of behaviors was 4.2, and behaviors appeared related to developmental tasks most recently mastered. Results indicate a need for antenatal counseling, sibling visitation during the hospital stay, and follow-up during the postpartum period.

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