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SEXUALITY: Knowledge and Attitudes of Student Nurse-Midwives

Authors

  • Deborah Greener CNM, MS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Deborah Greener received her RN diploma in 1974 from Henry Ford Hospital, School of Nursing, Detroit, Michigan. She received a BSN from Wayne State University in 1980 and an MS in Parent-Child Nursing and Nurse-Midwifery from University of Utah, College of Nursing in 1982. She is currently an instructor in nurse-midwifery at the University of Utah, and a doctoral student in Educational Psychology.
    2. Patricia Reagan received her PhD in Health Education from the University of Illinois in 1978 and her MPH from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985. Author of Intimate Issues, a sexuality workbook, she is a public speaker and activist regarding women's health issues, and an Associate Professor of Health Education at the University of Utah.
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  • Patricia Reagan PhD, MPH

    1. Patricia Reagan received her PhD in Health Education from the University of Illinois in 1978 and her MPH from the University of California at Berkeley in 1985. Author of Intimate Issues, a sexuality workbook, she is a public speaker and activist regarding women's health issues, and an Associate Professor of Health Education at the University of Utah.
    Search for more papers by this author

University of Utah College of Nursing, 25 S. Medical Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112.

ABSTRACT

This study was performed to assess the sexual knowledge and attitudes of student nurse-midwives (SNMs). All SNMs enrolled in nurse-midwifery programs between November 1981 and February 1982 were surveyed. Instruments used included the Sexual Knowledge and Attitude Test and a demographic and background data questionnaire. Significant findings included generally liberal attitudes toward heterosexual relations, autoeroticism, and the rejection of common sexual myths; more conservative attitudes toward abortion were found. No significant differences in knowledge and/or attitudes were revealed when groups were compared on the basis of age, marital status, level in nurse-midwifery programs, or length of time in nursing. Significant differences were found when comparisons were made based on religious preference, degree of urbanization, educational level, type of nurse-midwifery program, and prior human sexuality education. The implications of these differences for nurse-midwifery practice, education, and research are discussed.

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