WIBANGBE: THE MAKING OF A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT THE TRAINING AND SUPERVISION OF TRADITIONAL BIRTH ATTENDANTS IN ZAIRE

Authors

  • Gilberte A. Vansintejan MPH, EDD,

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      54 Morningside Drive, # 61, New York, NY 10025.
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    • Gilberte A. Vansintejan, Nurse-midwife from Belgium, has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University and an Ed.D. from Columbia University. She has worked with the World Health Organization in less developed countries. Since 1978, she has been a free-lance consultant to the United Nations, USAID, and nongovernmental agencies. She has been working in curriculum development, and in training nurses and midwives as trainers and family planning providers. Currently, she lives in New York City.

  • William A. Glaser PHD

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    • William A. Glaser is Professor of Health Services Administration at the New School for Social Research in New York. He received a Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in political science. He specializes in cross-national comparative research about health services, government, and other topics. His books on comparative health care include Paying the Doctor (1970), Social Setting and Medical Organization (1970), Health Insurance Bargaining (1978) and Paying the Hospital (1987). From other crossnational research, he has written The Brain Drain (1978).


54 Morningside Drive, # 61, New York, NY 10025.

ABSTRACT

In Karawa, Zaire, traditional midwives are eager to learn maternal and child health care from the modern sector. This is documented in a film targeted to health personnel and planners interested in primary health care in developing countries. A 23-minute movie depicts all aspects of the interactions between traditional and modern health systems in a specific rural area. We see the selection, training, collaboration and supervision in the community. The article describes the various steps for training TBAs and making a documentary movie.

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