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BIRTH REGISTRATION: NURSE-MIDWIFERY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Authors

  • Lisa L. Paine cnm, ms, mph,

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      704 Glen Allen Drive, Baltimore, MD 21229.
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    • Lisa L. Paine, cnm, ms, mph, a nurse-midwife at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and an Assistant, Department of GYN/OB, at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is the Chair of the Research and Statistics Committee and a member of the Governing Board, Division of Accreditation of the ACNM. She received her nurse-midwifery education at the University of Utah in 1982 and is currently a Dr.P.H. candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.

  • Deborah L. Greener cnm, ms,

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    • Deborah L. Greener, cnm, ms, is an Assistant Professor of Parent-Child & Adult Nursing and teaches in the nurse-midwifery program at the University of Utah. A member of the Research and Statistics Committee and the Division of Competency Assessment of the ACNM, she received her nurse-midwifery education from the University of Utah in 1982 and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Educational Psychology & Measurement at the University of Utah.

  • Donna M. Strobino phd

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    • Donna M. Strobino, phd, is an Associate Professor of Maternal and Child Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland. She received her Ph.D. in Population Dynamics from the Johns Hopkins University in 1976. She has conducted several studies using vital records and has been involved with consultation and technical assistance to states regarding the use of vital statistics in program planning and evaluation.


704 Glen Allen Drive, Baltimore, MD 21229.

ABSTRACT

The birth certificate is not only an official, legal document, but also provides critical health planning and research data. This article provides an overview of birth registration in the United States, discusses the functions of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), delineates the role of the CNM in birth certification, presents information regarding the 1989 Revised Standard Birth Certificate, and examines the quality and uses of birth certificate data. The implications of this information about vital statistics for nurse-midwifery practice, research and education are discussed and specific suggestions are made for improving the accuracy of birth registration data provided by CNMs.

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